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Title: Reducing adhesion energy of micro-relay electrodes by ion beam synthesized oxide nanolayers

Abstract

Reduction in the adhesion energy of contacting metal electrode surfaces in nano-electro-mechanical switches is crucial for operation with low hysteresis voltage. We demonstrate that by forming thin layers of metal-oxides on metals such as Ru and W, the adhesion energy can be reduced by up to a factor of ten. We employ a low-energy ion-beam synthesis technique and subsequent thermal annealing to form very thin layers (~2 nm) of metal-oxides (such as RuO 2 and WO x) on Ru and W metal surfaces and quantify the adhesion energy using an atomic force microscope with microspherical tips.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2]; ORCiD logo [3];  [4];  [2];  [1]
  1. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division. Molecular Foundry
  2. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences
  3. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering
  4. Axcelis Technologies, Beverly, MA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22); National Science Foundation (NSF)
OSTI Identifier:
1411655
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231; 0939514
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
APL Materials
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 5; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 2166-532X
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; adhesion; metal surfaces; atomic force microscopy; relays; metal to metal contacts

Citation Formats

Saha, Bivas, Peschot, Alexis, Osoba, Benjamin, Ko, Changhyun, Rubin, Leonard, Liu, Tsu-Jae King, and Wu, Junqiao. Reducing adhesion energy of micro-relay electrodes by ion beam synthesized oxide nanolayers. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4978436.
Saha, Bivas, Peschot, Alexis, Osoba, Benjamin, Ko, Changhyun, Rubin, Leonard, Liu, Tsu-Jae King, & Wu, Junqiao. Reducing adhesion energy of micro-relay electrodes by ion beam synthesized oxide nanolayers. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4978436.
Saha, Bivas, Peschot, Alexis, Osoba, Benjamin, Ko, Changhyun, Rubin, Leonard, Liu, Tsu-Jae King, and Wu, Junqiao. Thu . "Reducing adhesion energy of micro-relay electrodes by ion beam synthesized oxide nanolayers". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4978436. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1411655.
@article{osti_1411655,
title = {Reducing adhesion energy of micro-relay electrodes by ion beam synthesized oxide nanolayers},
author = {Saha, Bivas and Peschot, Alexis and Osoba, Benjamin and Ko, Changhyun and Rubin, Leonard and Liu, Tsu-Jae King and Wu, Junqiao},
abstractNote = {Reduction in the adhesion energy of contacting metal electrode surfaces in nano-electro-mechanical switches is crucial for operation with low hysteresis voltage. We demonstrate that by forming thin layers of metal-oxides on metals such as Ru and W, the adhesion energy can be reduced by up to a factor of ten. We employ a low-energy ion-beam synthesis technique and subsequent thermal annealing to form very thin layers (~2 nm) of metal-oxides (such as RuO2 and WOx) on Ru and W metal surfaces and quantify the adhesion energy using an atomic force microscope with microspherical tips.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4978436},
journal = {APL Materials},
number = 3,
volume = 5,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 09 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Thu Mar 09 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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