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Title: Laboratory earthquakes triggered during eclogitization of lawsonite-bearing blueschist

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1411450
Grant/Contract Number:
FG02-94ER14466; AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Earth and Planetary Science Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 459; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-12-05 23:15:07; Journal ID: ISSN 0012-821X
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Incel, Sarah, Hilairet, Nadège, Labrousse, Loïc, John, Timm, Deldicque, Damien, Ferrand, Thomas, Wang, Yanbin, Renner, Jörg, Morales, Luiz, and Schubnel, Alexandre. Laboratory earthquakes triggered during eclogitization of lawsonite-bearing blueschist. Netherlands: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.epsl.2016.11.047.
Incel, Sarah, Hilairet, Nadège, Labrousse, Loïc, John, Timm, Deldicque, Damien, Ferrand, Thomas, Wang, Yanbin, Renner, Jörg, Morales, Luiz, & Schubnel, Alexandre. Laboratory earthquakes triggered during eclogitization of lawsonite-bearing blueschist. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.epsl.2016.11.047.
Incel, Sarah, Hilairet, Nadège, Labrousse, Loïc, John, Timm, Deldicque, Damien, Ferrand, Thomas, Wang, Yanbin, Renner, Jörg, Morales, Luiz, and Schubnel, Alexandre. Wed . "Laboratory earthquakes triggered during eclogitization of lawsonite-bearing blueschist". Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.epsl.2016.11.047.
@article{osti_1411450,
title = {Laboratory earthquakes triggered during eclogitization of lawsonite-bearing blueschist},
author = {Incel, Sarah and Hilairet, Nadège and Labrousse, Loïc and John, Timm and Deldicque, Damien and Ferrand, Thomas and Wang, Yanbin and Renner, Jörg and Morales, Luiz and Schubnel, Alexandre},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.epsl.2016.11.047},
journal = {Earth and Planetary Science Letters},
number = C,
volume = 459,
place = {Netherlands},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.epsl.2016.11.047

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 2works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • The origin of intermediate-depth seismicity has been debated for decades. A substantial fraction of these events occurs within the upper plane of Wadati–Benioff double seismic zones believed to represent subducting oceanic crust. We deformed natural lawsonite-rich blueschist samples under eclogite-facies conditions (1.52.5 GPa to maximum temperatures ranging from 762 to 1073 K, during which lawsonite and glaucophane became gradually unstable while entering the stability field of lawsonite–eclogite and the breakdown reaction of lawsonite was only crossed in case of the highest final temperature; ii) heating while deforming at a pressure <2 GPa to a maximum temperature of 1121 K associatedmore » with crossing the breakdown reaction of lawsonite and successively entering the stability fields of epidote–blueschist and eclogite–amphibolite but not of lawsonite–eclogite. Upon entering the Lws-Ecl stability field samples exhibited brittle failure, accompanied by the radiation of AEs. In-situ X-ray diffraction and microstructural analysis demonstrate that fractures are topologically related to the formation of omphacite. Amorphous material was detected along the fractures by transmission-electron microscopy without evidence for free-water. Since the newly formed omphacite crystals are small compared to the initial grains, we interpret the observed mechanical instability as a transformation-induced runaway under stress triggered during the transition from lawsonite–blueschist to lawsonite–eclogite. In contrast, we find no microstructural evidence that the breakdown of lawsonite, and hence the liberation of water leads to the fracturing in samples that experienced the highest quench temperatures of 1073 and 1121 K, although some AEs were detected during an experiment performed at 1.5 GPa. Our experimental results challenge the concept of “dehydration embrittlement”, which ascribes the genesis of intermediate-depth earthquakes to the breakdown of hydrous phases in the subducting oceanic plate. Instead we suggest that grain-size reduction (transformational faulting) during the transition from lawsonite–blueschist to lawsonite–eclogite leads to brittle failure of the deviatorically loaded samples.« less
  • Cited by 1
  • Seismicity is correlated in space and time with production from some oil and gas fields where pore pressures have declined by several tens of megapascals. Reverse faulting has occurred both above and below petroleum reservoirs, and normal faulting has occurred on the flanks of at least one reservoir. The theory of poroelasticity requires that fluid extraction locally alter the state of stress. Calculations with simple geometries predict stress perturbations that are consistent with observed earthquake locations and focal mechanisms. Measurements of surface displacement and strain, pore pressure, stress, and poroelastic rock properties in such areas could be used to testmore » theoretical predictions and improve our understanding of earthquake mechanics.« less
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  • The geophysical arguments relevant to the depth extent of mantle convection are reviewed with special attention to the seismic properties of subducted lithosphere. New focal mechanism solutions of deep and intermediate earthquakes from the Tonga-Kermadec region are presented, but it is then shown that these do not provide an unambiguous constraint regarding the ability of subducted material to penetrate below 700 km. Estimates of the seismic energy release as a function of depth in Tonga show very large energy release in the depth range 500--700 km, which is just above the depth at which all seismicity ends. This property ofmore » the seismicity proves to be the most suggestive of the inability of subducted meterial to penetrate below 700-km depth.« less