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Title: A genome-wide structure-based survey of nucleotide binding proteins in M. tuberculosis

Abstract

Nucleoside tri-phosphates (NTP) form an important class of small molecule ligands that participate in, and are essential to a large number of biological processes. Here, we seek to identify the NTP binding proteome (NTPome) in M. tuberculosis (M.tb), a deadly pathogen. Identifying the NTPome is useful not only for gaining functional insights of the individual proteins but also for identifying useful drug targets. From an earlier study, we had structural models of M.tb at a proteome scale from which a set of 13,858 small molecule binding pockets were identified. We use a set of NTP binding sub-structural motifs derived from a previous study and scan the M.tb pocketome, and find that 1,768 proteins or 43% of the proteome can theoretically bind NTP ligands. Using an experimental proteomics approach involving dye-ligand affinity chromatography, we confirm NTP binding to 47 different proteins, of which 4 are hypothetical proteins. Our analysis also provides the precise list of binding site residues in each case, and the probable ligand binding pose. In conclusion, as the list includes a number of known and potential drug targets, the identification of NTP binding can directly facilitate structure-based drug design of these targets.

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [2];  [1];  [3];  [1]
  1. National Mathematics Initiative, Bangalore (India)
  2. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  3. Molecular Biophysics Unit Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (India)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
National Institutes of Health (NIH); USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1411357
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-24509
Journal ID: ISSN 2045-2322
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Scientific Reports
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2045-2322
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; Biological Science

Citation Formats

Bhagavat, Raghu, Kim, Heung -Bok, Kim, Chang -Yub, Terwilliger, Thomas Charles, Mehta, Dolly, Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy, and Chandra, Nagasuma. A genome-wide structure-based survey of nucleotide binding proteins in M. tuberculosis. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-12471-8.
Bhagavat, Raghu, Kim, Heung -Bok, Kim, Chang -Yub, Terwilliger, Thomas Charles, Mehta, Dolly, Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy, & Chandra, Nagasuma. A genome-wide structure-based survey of nucleotide binding proteins in M. tuberculosis. United States. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-12471-8.
Bhagavat, Raghu, Kim, Heung -Bok, Kim, Chang -Yub, Terwilliger, Thomas Charles, Mehta, Dolly, Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy, and Chandra, Nagasuma. 2017. "A genome-wide structure-based survey of nucleotide binding proteins in M. tuberculosis". United States. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-12471-8. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1411357.
@article{osti_1411357,
title = {A genome-wide structure-based survey of nucleotide binding proteins in M. tuberculosis},
author = {Bhagavat, Raghu and Kim, Heung -Bok and Kim, Chang -Yub and Terwilliger, Thomas Charles and Mehta, Dolly and Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy and Chandra, Nagasuma},
abstractNote = {Nucleoside tri-phosphates (NTP) form an important class of small molecule ligands that participate in, and are essential to a large number of biological processes. Here, we seek to identify the NTP binding proteome (NTPome) in M. tuberculosis (M.tb), a deadly pathogen. Identifying the NTPome is useful not only for gaining functional insights of the individual proteins but also for identifying useful drug targets. From an earlier study, we had structural models of M.tb at a proteome scale from which a set of 13,858 small molecule binding pockets were identified. We use a set of NTP binding sub-structural motifs derived from a previous study and scan the M.tb pocketome, and find that 1,768 proteins or 43% of the proteome can theoretically bind NTP ligands. Using an experimental proteomics approach involving dye-ligand affinity chromatography, we confirm NTP binding to 47 different proteins, of which 4 are hypothetical proteins. Our analysis also provides the precise list of binding site residues in each case, and the probable ligand binding pose. In conclusion, as the list includes a number of known and potential drug targets, the identification of NTP binding can directly facilitate structure-based drug design of these targets.},
doi = {10.1038/s41598-017-12471-8},
journal = {Scientific Reports},
number = 1,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Journal Article:
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  • The annotation of protein function is almost completely performed by in silico approaches. However, computational prediction of protein function is frequently incomplete and error prone. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), ~25% of all genes have no predicted function and are annotated as hypothetical proteins. This lack of functional information severely limits our understanding of Mtb pathogenicity. Current tools for experimental functional annotation are limited and often do not scale to entire protein families. Here, we report a generally applicable chemical biology platform to functionally annotate bacterial proteins by combining activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) and quantitative LC-MS-based proteomics. As an example ofmore » this approach for high-throughput protein functional validation and discovery, we experimentally annotate the families of ATP-binding proteins in Mtb. Our data experimentally validate prior in silico predictions of >250 ATPases and adenosine nucleotide-binding proteins, and reveal 73 hypothetical proteins as novel ATP-binding proteins. We identify adenosine cofactor interactions with many hypothetical proteins containing a diversity of unrelated sequences, providing a new and expanded view of adenosine nucleotide binding in Mtb. Furthermore, many of these hypothetical proteins are both unique to Mycobacteria and essential for infection, suggesting specialized functions in mycobacterial physiology and pathogenicity. Thus, we provide a generally applicable approach for high throughput protein function discovery and validation, and highlight several ways in which application of activity-based proteomics data can improve the quality of functional annotations to facilitate novel biological insights.« less
  • The authors have analyzed guanine nucleotide binding proteins (G-proteins) in the olfactory epithelium of Rana catesbeiana using subunit-specific antisera. The olfactory epithelium contained the ..cap alpha.. subunits of three G-proteins, migrating on polyacrylamide gels in SDS with apparent molecular weights of 45,000, 42,000, and 40,000, corresponding to G/sub s/, G/sub i/, and G/sub o/, respectively. A single ..beta.. subunit with an apparent molecular weight of 36,000 was detected. An antiserum against the ..cap alpha.. subunit of retinal transducin failed to detect immunoreactive proteins in olfactory cilia detached from the epithelium. The olfactory cilia appeared to be enriched in immunoreactive G/submore » s..cap alpha../ relative to G/sub ichemically bond/ and G/sub ochemically bond/ when compared to membranes prepared from the olfactory epithelium after detachment of the cilia. Bound antibody was detected by autoradiography after incubation with (/sup 125/I)protein. Immunohistochemical studies using an antiserum against the ..beta.. subunit of G-proteins revealed intense staining of the ciliary surface of the olfactory epithelium and of the axon bundles in the lamina propria. In contrast, an antiserum against a common sequence of the ..cap alpha.. subunits preferentially stained the cell membranes of the olfactory receptor cells and the acinar cells of Bowman's glands and the deep submucosal glands. In addition to G-proteins, they have identified protein kinase C in olfactory cilia via a protein kinase C specific antiserum and via phorbol ester binding. However, in contrast to the G-proteins, protein kinase C occurred also in cilia isolated from respiratory epithelium.« less
  • Purpose: To identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with erectile dysfunction (ED) among African-American prostate cancer patients treated with external beam radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A cohort of African-American prostate cancer patients treated with external beam radiation therapy was observed for the development of ED by use of the five-item Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM) questionnaire. Final analysis included 27 cases (post-treatment SHIM score {<=}7) and 52 control subjects (post-treatment SHIM score {>=}16). A genome-wide association study was performed using approximately 909,000 SNPs genotyped on Affymetrix 6.0 arrays (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA). Results: We identified SNP rs2268363, locatedmore » in the follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene, as significantly associated with ED after correcting for multiple comparisons (unadjusted p = 5.46 x 10{sup -8}, Bonferroni p = 0.028). We identified four additional SNPs that tended toward a significant association with an unadjusted p value < 10{sup -6}. Inference of population substructure showed that cases had a higher proportion of African ancestry than control subjects (77% vs. 60%, p = 0.005). A multivariate logistic regression model that incorporated estimated ancestry and four of the top-ranked SNPs was a more accurate classifier of ED than a model that included only clinical variables. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first genome-wide association study to identify SNPs associated with adverse effects resulting from radiotherapy. It is important to note that the SNP that proved to be significantly associated with ED is located within a gene whose encoded product plays a role in male gonad development and function. Another key finding of this project is that the four SNPs most strongly associated with ED were specific to persons of African ancestry and would therefore not have been identified had a cohort of European ancestry been screened. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a genome-wide approach to investigate genetic predisposition to radiation injury.« less