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Title: Is there a relationship between fledge age and nest temperature in Western Bluebirds (Sialia mexicana)?

Abstract

Extensive research has been done on temperature during bird incubation periods, but little has been done during nestling development, and to our knowledge, no studies have been done on Western Bluebird (Sialia mexicana) nestling development. In this study, dataloggers were used to monitor nest temperatures during the nestling development phase of Western Bluebirds to determine if there was a relationship between fledge age and temperature. The study was conducted in an existing nestbox network at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the surrounding area in north-central New Mexico. Based on the age of the nestlings at fledging, the nestboxes (n=65) were split into three groups: early (16 and 17 days old, n=13), average (fledged at or between 18 and 20 days old, n=32), and late (21 days or older, n=20). The temperatures of the early and average (n=45) groups were not significantly different (p=0.32, W=3831000). There was a significant difference in the temperatures between the early and late groups (p=0.000, W=2965600). The early and average groups were then combined, tested against the late group, and were found to be significantly different (p=0.000, W=11315000). Analysis showed a difference within the first seven days post-hatch of 1.42°C between the early/average and late groupings.more » The results suggest that warmer nest temperatures during the nestling stage may influence the fledge date and may lead to faster fledging. There may be numerous explanations for this, such as a correlation with nestling development, and higher temperatures may allow for faster development. Brood size was non-significant and was not factored into the analysis. Future work should be directed in this area.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC). Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1411334
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-30843
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; Biological Science; temperature; datalogger; Western bluebird

Citation Formats

Phillips, Emily Marie, Thompson, Brent E., and Hathcock, Charles Dean. Is there a relationship between fledge age and nest temperature in Western Bluebirds (Sialia mexicana)?. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1411334.
Phillips, Emily Marie, Thompson, Brent E., & Hathcock, Charles Dean. Is there a relationship between fledge age and nest temperature in Western Bluebirds (Sialia mexicana)?. United States. doi:10.2172/1411334.
Phillips, Emily Marie, Thompson, Brent E., and Hathcock, Charles Dean. Thu . "Is there a relationship between fledge age and nest temperature in Western Bluebirds (Sialia mexicana)?". United States. doi:10.2172/1411334. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1411334.
@article{osti_1411334,
title = {Is there a relationship between fledge age and nest temperature in Western Bluebirds (Sialia mexicana)?},
author = {Phillips, Emily Marie and Thompson, Brent E. and Hathcock, Charles Dean},
abstractNote = {Extensive research has been done on temperature during bird incubation periods, but little has been done during nestling development, and to our knowledge, no studies have been done on Western Bluebird (Sialia mexicana) nestling development. In this study, dataloggers were used to monitor nest temperatures during the nestling development phase of Western Bluebirds to determine if there was a relationship between fledge age and temperature. The study was conducted in an existing nestbox network at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the surrounding area in north-central New Mexico. Based on the age of the nestlings at fledging, the nestboxes (n=65) were split into three groups: early (16 and 17 days old, n=13), average (fledged at or between 18 and 20 days old, n=32), and late (21 days or older, n=20). The temperatures of the early and average (n=45) groups were not significantly different (p=0.32, W=3831000). There was a significant difference in the temperatures between the early and late groups (p=0.000, W=2965600). The early and average groups were then combined, tested against the late group, and were found to be significantly different (p=0.000, W=11315000). Analysis showed a difference within the first seven days post-hatch of 1.42°C between the early/average and late groupings. The results suggest that warmer nest temperatures during the nestling stage may influence the fledge date and may lead to faster fledging. There may be numerous explanations for this, such as a correlation with nestling development, and higher temperatures may allow for faster development. Brood size was non-significant and was not factored into the analysis. Future work should be directed in this area.},
doi = {10.2172/1411334},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Nov 30 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Thu Nov 30 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

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