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Title: Rare events of massive plant reproductive investment lead to long-term density-dependent reproductive success

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [3];  [4];  [5]; ORCiD logo [6];
  1. Centro de Ecologia Aplicada Prof. Baeta Neves/InBio, Instituto Superior de Agronomia, University of Lisbon, Lisboa Portugal, Władysław Szafer Institute of Botany, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kraków Poland
  2. Institute of Systematics and Evolution of Animals, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kraków Poland
  3. Department of Plant Ecology and Environment Protection, Faculty of Biology, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań Poland
  4. Department of Forest Biodiversity, Faculty of Forestry, Institute of Forest Ecology and Silviculture, University of Agriculture in Krakow, Kraków Poland
  5. Władysław Szafer Institute of Botany, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kraków Poland
  6. Centro de Ecologia Aplicada Prof. Baeta Neves/InBio, Instituto Superior de Agronomia, University of Lisbon, Lisboa Portugal, Department of Conservation Biology, Estación Biológica de Doñana (EBD - CSIC), Seville Spain
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), Fuel Cycle Technologies (NE-5)
OSTI Identifier:
1411261
Grant/Contract Number:
IF/00728/2013
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Ecology
Additional Journal Information:
Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-12-05 07:26:16; Journal ID: ISSN 0022-0477
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Żywiec, Magdalena, Ledwoń, Mateusz, Holeksa, Jan, Seget, Piotr, Łopata, Barbara, Fedriani, José Maria, and Zhou, ed., Shurong. Rare events of massive plant reproductive investment lead to long-term density-dependent reproductive success. United Kingdom: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1111/1365-2745.12896.
Żywiec, Magdalena, Ledwoń, Mateusz, Holeksa, Jan, Seget, Piotr, Łopata, Barbara, Fedriani, José Maria, & Zhou, ed., Shurong. Rare events of massive plant reproductive investment lead to long-term density-dependent reproductive success. United Kingdom. doi:10.1111/1365-2745.12896.
Żywiec, Magdalena, Ledwoń, Mateusz, Holeksa, Jan, Seget, Piotr, Łopata, Barbara, Fedriani, José Maria, and Zhou, ed., Shurong. 2017. "Rare events of massive plant reproductive investment lead to long-term density-dependent reproductive success". United Kingdom. doi:10.1111/1365-2745.12896.
@article{osti_1411261,
title = {Rare events of massive plant reproductive investment lead to long-term density-dependent reproductive success},
author = {Żywiec, Magdalena and Ledwoń, Mateusz and Holeksa, Jan and Seget, Piotr and Łopata, Barbara and Fedriani, José Maria and Zhou, ed., Shurong},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1111/1365-2745.12896},
journal = {Journal of Ecology},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on December 4, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

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  • Short-term screening tests with the zebra fish (Brachydanio rerio) have been developed for predicting the potential of xenobiotics to impair reproductive success in fish. The aim was to find simple and sensitive test parameters and to simulate exposure situations typical for anadromous fish species (salmonids), which generally cross heavily polluted coastal areas or estuaries before they reach uncontaminated upstream spawning areas. Therefore, particular attention was directed to tests designed to assess adverse effects induced during gametogenesis in adult fish. The test protocol involves exposure of adults prior to, but not during, spawning and the effects are measured in the offspringmore » as alterations in hatching frequency and hatching rate of eggs, and survival and stress tolerance of embryos and larvae. Some representative examples of the application of these tests are given, and it is shown that impairment of reproductive success can be induced by exposure of parent fish prior to spawning at concentrations of xenobiotics at least five times lower than those yielding effects during direct exposure of embryos and larvae. It is suggested that, in hazard assessment programs, tests of the effect of xenobiotics on the offspring of preexposed adults be routinely incorporated.« less
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