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Title: Calling computers names in Swedish

Abstract

I very much enjoyed reading Jim Fleming’s article on Carl-Gustaf Rossby and the seminal contributions Rossby made to meteorology. Furthermore, the otherwise excellent article has two errors. Something must have gotten lost in translation to cause Fleming to claim that “Rossby pursued numerical weather prediction in Sweden in an era in which there was no Swedish word for digital computer.” With applied mathematician Germund Dahlquist, Rossby developed a weather model for the Binär Elektronisk Sekvens Kalkylator (BESK; Binary Electronic Sequence Calculator). Designed and built in Sweden, BESK was the world’s fastest computer when it became operational in 1953. From September 1954, BESK weather simulations enabled routine 24-hour national forecasts.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1411214
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Physics Today
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 70; Journal Issue: 11; Journal ID: ISSN 0031-9228
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING

Citation Formats

Carlsson, Johan. Calling computers names in Swedish. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1063/PT.3.3750.
Carlsson, Johan. Calling computers names in Swedish. United States. doi:10.1063/PT.3.3750.
Carlsson, Johan. Wed . "Calling computers names in Swedish". United States. doi:10.1063/PT.3.3750.
@article{osti_1411214,
title = {Calling computers names in Swedish},
author = {Carlsson, Johan},
abstractNote = {I very much enjoyed reading Jim Fleming’s article on Carl-Gustaf Rossby and the seminal contributions Rossby made to meteorology. Furthermore, the otherwise excellent article has two errors. Something must have gotten lost in translation to cause Fleming to claim that “Rossby pursued numerical weather prediction in Sweden in an era in which there was no Swedish word for digital computer.” With applied mathematician Germund Dahlquist, Rossby developed a weather model for the Binär Elektronisk Sekvens Kalkylator (BESK; Binary Electronic Sequence Calculator). Designed and built in Sweden, BESK was the world’s fastest computer when it became operational in 1953. From September 1954, BESK weather simulations enabled routine 24-hour national forecasts.},
doi = {10.1063/PT.3.3750},
journal = {Physics Today},
number = 11,
volume = 70,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Nov 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Wed Nov 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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