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Title: Characterization of the LAWB99-series and ORLEC-series Glasses

Abstract

In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analysis results for a series of simulated low activity waste (LAW) glass compositions. These data will be used in the development of improved sulfur solubility models for LAW glass. A procedure developed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for producing sulfur saturated melts (SSMs) was used to fabricate the glasses characterized in this report. This method includes triplicate melting steps with excess sodium sulfate, followed by grinding and washing to remove unincorporated sulfur salts. The wash solutions were also analyzed as part of this study.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM)
OSTI Identifier:
1411196
Report Number(s):
SRNL-STI-2017-00725
DOE Contract Number:
AC09-08SR22470
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; low activity waste; glass; sulfur; Hanford

Citation Formats

Fox, K. M., Edwards, T. B., and Riley, W. T.. Characterization of the LAWB99-series and ORLEC-series Glasses. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1411196.
Fox, K. M., Edwards, T. B., & Riley, W. T.. Characterization of the LAWB99-series and ORLEC-series Glasses. United States. doi:10.2172/1411196.
Fox, K. M., Edwards, T. B., and Riley, W. T.. 2017. "Characterization of the LAWB99-series and ORLEC-series Glasses". United States. doi:10.2172/1411196. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1411196.
@article{osti_1411196,
title = {Characterization of the LAWB99-series and ORLEC-series Glasses},
author = {Fox, K. M. and Edwards, T. B. and Riley, W. T.},
abstractNote = {In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analysis results for a series of simulated low activity waste (LAW) glass compositions. These data will be used in the development of improved sulfur solubility models for LAW glass. A procedure developed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for producing sulfur saturated melts (SSMs) was used to fabricate the glasses characterized in this report. This method includes triplicate melting steps with excess sodium sulfate, followed by grinding and washing to remove unincorporated sulfur salts. The wash solutions were also analyzed as part of this study.},
doi = {10.2172/1411196},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Technical Report:

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