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Title: Absorption of a particle by a rotating black hole: The potential barrier

Abstract

For a test particle approaching a rapidly rotating black hole we find a range of values of the particle’s energy and angular momentum, on the order of 1% or more of the corresponding values of the hole, such that three conditions are satisfied. The particle can reach the horizon. After absorption the new hole still has a horizon. The area of the new hole is less than the area of the original one, in apparent violation of a theorem of Hawking. As a result, we offer support for the claim that the test particle approximation is the cause of the violation.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1410617
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-23309
Journal ID: ISSN 0217-751X; TRN: US1800137
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
International Journal of Modern Physics A
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 31; Journal Issue: 25; Journal ID: ISSN 0217-751X
Publisher:
World Scientific
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS; Astronomy and Astrophysics; absorption of a particle; rotating black hole; potential barrier; area theorem; test particle approximation

Citation Formats

Heller, Leon. Absorption of a particle by a rotating black hole: The potential barrier. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1142/S0217751X16501347.
Heller, Leon. Absorption of a particle by a rotating black hole: The potential barrier. United States. doi:10.1142/S0217751X16501347.
Heller, Leon. Fri . "Absorption of a particle by a rotating black hole: The potential barrier". United States. doi:10.1142/S0217751X16501347. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1410617.
@article{osti_1410617,
title = {Absorption of a particle by a rotating black hole: The potential barrier},
author = {Heller, Leon},
abstractNote = {For a test particle approaching a rapidly rotating black hole we find a range of values of the particle’s energy and angular momentum, on the order of 1% or more of the corresponding values of the hole, such that three conditions are satisfied. The particle can reach the horizon. After absorption the new hole still has a horizon. The area of the new hole is less than the area of the original one, in apparent violation of a theorem of Hawking. As a result, we offer support for the claim that the test particle approximation is the cause of the violation.},
doi = {10.1142/S0217751X16501347},
journal = {International Journal of Modern Physics A},
number = 25,
volume = 31,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Sep 02 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Fri Sep 02 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Journal Article:
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