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Title: Introducing perennial biomass crops into agricultural landscapes to address water quality challenges and provide other environmental services: Integrating perennial bioenergy crops into agricultural landscapes

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont IL USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1410600
Grant/Contract Number:
ACO2-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews. Energy and Environment
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal Issue: 2; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2018-02-15 21:42:41; Journal ID: ISSN 2041-8396
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Cacho, J. F., Negri, M. C., Zumpf, C. R., and Campbell, P.. Introducing perennial biomass crops into agricultural landscapes to address water quality challenges and provide other environmental services: Integrating perennial bioenergy crops into agricultural landscapes. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/wene.275.
Cacho, J. F., Negri, M. C., Zumpf, C. R., & Campbell, P.. Introducing perennial biomass crops into agricultural landscapes to address water quality challenges and provide other environmental services: Integrating perennial bioenergy crops into agricultural landscapes. United States. doi:10.1002/wene.275.
Cacho, J. F., Negri, M. C., Zumpf, C. R., and Campbell, P.. 2017. "Introducing perennial biomass crops into agricultural landscapes to address water quality challenges and provide other environmental services: Integrating perennial bioenergy crops into agricultural landscapes". United States. doi:10.1002/wene.275.
@article{osti_1410600,
title = {Introducing perennial biomass crops into agricultural landscapes to address water quality challenges and provide other environmental services: Integrating perennial bioenergy crops into agricultural landscapes},
author = {Cacho, J. F. and Negri, M. C. and Zumpf, C. R. and Campbell, P.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/wene.275},
journal = {Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews. Energy and Environment},
number = 2,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on November 29, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

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  • Replacing row crops with perennial bioenergy crops may reduce nitrogen (N) loading to surface waters. We estimated the benefits, costs, and potential for replacing maize with switchgrass to meet required N loading reduction targets for the Chesapeake Bay (CB) of 26.9 Gg -1. After subtracting the potential reduction in N loading due to improved N fertilizer practices for maize, a further 22.8 Gg reduction is required. Replacing maize with fertilized switchgrass could reduce N loading to the CB by 18 kg ha -1 y -1, meeting 31% of the N reduction target. The break-even price of fertilized switchgrass to providemore » the same profit as maize in the CB is 111 $Mg -1 (oven-dry basis throughout). Growers replacing maize with switchgrass could receive an ecosystem service payment of 148 ha -1 based on the price paid in Maryland for planting a rye cover crop. For our estimated average switchgrass yield of 9.9 Mg ha -1, and the greater N loading reduction of switchgrass compared to a cover crop, this equates to 24 dollars Mg -1. The annual cost of this ecosystem service payment to induce switchgrass planting is 13.29 dollars kg -1 of N. Using the POLYSYS model to account for competition among food, feed, and biomass markets, we found that with the ecosystem service payment for switchgrass of 25 $ Mg -1 added to a farm-gate price of 111 dollars Mg -1, 11% of the N loading reduction target could be met while also producing 1.3 Tg of switchgrass, potentially yielding 420 dam 3 y -1 of ethanol.« less
  • Wild bee populations are currently under threat, which has led to recent efforts to increase pollinator habitat in North America. Simultaneously, U.S. federal energy policies are beginning to encourage perennial bioenergy cropping (PBC) systems, which have the potential to support native bees. Our objective was to explore the potentially interactive effects of crop composition, total PBC area, and PBC patches in different landscape configurations. Using a spatially-explicit modeling approach, the Lonsdorf model, we simulated the impacts of three perennial bioenergy crops (PBC: willow, switchgrass, and prairie), three scenarios with different total PBC area (11.7%, 23.5% and 28.8% of agricultural landmore » converted to PBC) and two types of landscape configurations (PBC in clustered landscape patterns that represent realistic future configurations or in dispersed neutral landscape models) on a nest abundance index in an Illinois landscape. Our modeling results suggest that crop composition and PBC area are particularly important for bee nest abundance, whereas landscape configuration is associated with bee nest abundance at the local scale but less so at the regional scale. Moreover, strategies to enhance wild bee habitat should therefore emphasize the crop composition and amount of PBC.« less
  • Cellulosic bioenergy feedstock such as perennial grasses and crop residues are expected to play a significant role in meeting US biofuel production targets. Here, we used an improved version of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to forecast impacts on watershed hydrology and water quality by implementing an array of plausible land-use changes associated with commercial bioenergy crop production for two watersheds in the Midwest USA. Watershed-scale impacts were estimated for 13 bioenergy crop production scenarios, including: production of Miscanthus 9 giganteus and upland Shawnee switchgrass on highly erodible landscape positions, agricultural marginal land areas and pastures, removal ofmore » corn stover and combinations of these options. We also measured water quality as erosion and sediment loading; this was forecasted to improve compared to baseline when perennial grasses were used for bioenergy production, but not with stover removal scenarios. Erosion reduction with perennial energy crop production scenarios ranged between 0.2% and 59%. Stream flow at the watershed outlet was reduced between 0 and 8% across these bioenergy crop production scenarios compared to baseline across the study watersheds. Our results indicate that bioenergy production scenarios that incorporate perennial grasses reduced the nonpoint source pollutant load at the watershed outlet compared to the baseline conditions (0–20% for nitrate-nitrogen and 3–56% for mineral phosphorus); but, the reduction rates were specific to site characteristics and management practices.« less
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