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Title: Selenium Impregnated Monolithic Carbons as Free-Standing Cathodes for High Volumetric Energy Lithium and Sodium Metal Batteries

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Chemistry and Materials, State University of New York, Binghamton NY 13902 USA
  2. Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering and Mechanical Engineering, Clarkson University, Potsdam NY 13699 USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1410378
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0018074
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Advanced Energy Materials
Additional Journal Information:
Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-11-27 08:17:21; Journal ID: ISSN 1614-6832
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Country of Publication:
Germany
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Ding, Jia, Zhou, Hui, Zhang, Hanlei, Tong, Linyue, and Mitlin, David. Selenium Impregnated Monolithic Carbons as Free-Standing Cathodes for High Volumetric Energy Lithium and Sodium Metal Batteries. Germany: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/aenm.201701918.
Ding, Jia, Zhou, Hui, Zhang, Hanlei, Tong, Linyue, & Mitlin, David. Selenium Impregnated Monolithic Carbons as Free-Standing Cathodes for High Volumetric Energy Lithium and Sodium Metal Batteries. Germany. doi:10.1002/aenm.201701918.
Ding, Jia, Zhou, Hui, Zhang, Hanlei, Tong, Linyue, and Mitlin, David. 2017. "Selenium Impregnated Monolithic Carbons as Free-Standing Cathodes for High Volumetric Energy Lithium and Sodium Metal Batteries". Germany. doi:10.1002/aenm.201701918.
@article{osti_1410378,
title = {Selenium Impregnated Monolithic Carbons as Free-Standing Cathodes for High Volumetric Energy Lithium and Sodium Metal Batteries},
author = {Ding, Jia and Zhou, Hui and Zhang, Hanlei and Tong, Linyue and Mitlin, David},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/aenm.201701918},
journal = {Advanced Energy Materials},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {Germany},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on November 27, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

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