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Title: Continuous Melt-Drawing of Highly Aligned Flexible and Stretchable Semiconducting Microfibers for Organic Electronics

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette IN 47907 USA
  2. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana−Champaign, Urbana IL 61801 USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1410363
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Advanced Functional Materials
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 28; Journal Issue: 4; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2018-01-22 11:08:34; Journal ID: ISSN 1616-301X
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Country of Publication:
Germany
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Zhao, Yan, Gumyusenge, Aristide, He, Jiazhi, Qu, Ge, McNutt, William W., Long, Yuan, Zhang, Hongyi, Huang, Libai, Diao, Ying, and Mei, Jianguo. Continuous Melt-Drawing of Highly Aligned Flexible and Stretchable Semiconducting Microfibers for Organic Electronics. Germany: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/adfm.201705584.
Zhao, Yan, Gumyusenge, Aristide, He, Jiazhi, Qu, Ge, McNutt, William W., Long, Yuan, Zhang, Hongyi, Huang, Libai, Diao, Ying, & Mei, Jianguo. Continuous Melt-Drawing of Highly Aligned Flexible and Stretchable Semiconducting Microfibers for Organic Electronics. Germany. doi:10.1002/adfm.201705584.
Zhao, Yan, Gumyusenge, Aristide, He, Jiazhi, Qu, Ge, McNutt, William W., Long, Yuan, Zhang, Hongyi, Huang, Libai, Diao, Ying, and Mei, Jianguo. Fri . "Continuous Melt-Drawing of Highly Aligned Flexible and Stretchable Semiconducting Microfibers for Organic Electronics". Germany. doi:10.1002/adfm.201705584.
@article{osti_1410363,
title = {Continuous Melt-Drawing of Highly Aligned Flexible and Stretchable Semiconducting Microfibers for Organic Electronics},
author = {Zhao, Yan and Gumyusenge, Aristide and He, Jiazhi and Qu, Ge and McNutt, William W. and Long, Yuan and Zhang, Hongyi and Huang, Libai and Diao, Ying and Mei, Jianguo},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/adfm.201705584},
journal = {Advanced Functional Materials},
number = 4,
volume = 28,
place = {Germany},
year = {Fri Nov 24 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Fri Nov 24 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on November 24, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

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  • The primary goal of the field concerned with organic semiconductors is to produce devices with performance approaching that of silicon electronics, but with the deformability—flexibility and stretchability—of conventional plastics. However, an inherent competition between deformability and charge transport has long been observed in these materials, and achieving the extreme (or even moderate) deformability implied by the word “plastic” concurrently with high charge transport may be elusive. This competition arises because the properties needed for high carrier mobilities—e.g., rigid chains in π-conjugated polymers and high degrees of crystallinity in the solid state—are antithetical to deformability. On the device scale, this competitionmore » can lead to low-performance yet mechanically robust devices, or high-performance devices that fail catastrophically (e.g., cracking, cohesive failure, and delamination) under strain. There are, however, some observations that contradict the notion of the mutual exclusivity of electronic and mechanical performances. These observations suggest that this problem may not be a fundamental trade-off, but rather an inconvenience that may be negotiated by a logical selection of materials and processing conditions. For example, the selection of the poly(3-alkylthiophene) with a critical side-chain length—poly(3-heptylthiophene) (n = 7)—marries the high deformability of poly(3-octylthiophene) (n = 8) with the high electronic performance (as manifested in photovoltaic efficiency) of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (n = 6). This review explores the relationship between deformability and charge transport in organic semiconductors. The principal conclusions are that reducing the competition between these two parameters is in fact possible, with two demonstrated routes being: (1) incorporation of softer, insulating material into a stiffer, semiconducting material and (2) increasing disorder in a highly ordered film, but not enough to disrupt charge transport pathways. The aim of this review is to provide a bridge between the fields interested in electronic properties and mechanical properties of conjugated polymers. We provide a high-level introduction to some of the important electronic and mechanical properties and measurement techniques for organic electronic devices, demonstrate an apparent competition between good electronic performance and mechanical deformability, and highlight potential strategies for overcoming this undesirable competition. A marriage of these two fields would allow for rational design of materials for applications requiring large-area, low-cost, printable devices that are ultra-flexible or stretchable, such as organic photovoltaic devices and wearable, conformable, or implantable sensors.« less
  • Developing a molecular design paradigm for conjugated polymers applicable to intrinsically stretchable semiconductors is crucial toward the next generation of wearable electronics. Current molecular design rules for high charge carrier mobility semiconducting polymers are unable to render the fabricated devices simultaneously stretchable and mechanically robust. Here in this paper, we present a new design concept to address the above challenge, while maintaining excellent electronic performance. This concept involves introducing chemical moieties to promote dynamic non-covalent crosslinking of the conjugated polymers. These non-covalent covalent crosslinking moieties are able to undergo an energy dissipation mechanism through breakage of bonds when strain ismore » applied, while retaining its high charge transport ability. As a result, our polymer is able to recover its high mobility performance (>1 cm 2/Vs) even after 100 cycles at 100% applied strain. Furthermore, we observed that the polymer can be efficiently repaired and/or healed with a simple heat and solvent treatment. These improved mechanical properties of our fabricated stretchable semiconductor enabled us to fabricate highly stretchable and high performance wearable organic transistors. This material design concept should illuminate and advance the pathways for future development of fully stretchable and healable skin-inspired wearable electronics.« less
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  • The fabrication of an aligned array of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with a single chiral state has been a significant challenge for SWCNT applications as well as for basic science research. Here, we developed a simple, unique technique to produce assemblies in which metallic, semiconducting, and single chiral state SWCNTs were densely and highly aligned. We utilized a crystal of surfactant as a template on which mono-dispersed SWCNTs in solution self-assembled. Micro-Raman measurements and scanning electron microscopy measurements clearly showed that the SWCNTs were highly and densely aligned parallel to the crystal axis, indicating that approximately 70% of the SWCNTsmore » were within 7° of being parallel. Moreover, the assemblies exhibited good field effect transistor characteristics with an on/off ratio of 1.3 × 10{sup 5}.« less