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Title: Phylogenetic relationships and phylogeography of relevant lineages within the complex Campanulaceae family in Macaronesia

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [3]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. CIBIO, Research Centre in Biodiversity and Genetic Resources, InBIO Associate Laboratory, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade dos Açores, Ponta Delgada Azores Portugal
  2. Linking Landscape, Environment, Agriculture and Food (LEAF), Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon Portugal, Centre for Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Changes (cE3c), Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon Portugal
  3. Madeira Botanical Group, Faculdade de Ciências da Vida, Universidade de Madeira, Alto da Penteada, Funchal Madeira Portugal
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), Fuel Cycle Technologies (NE-5)
OSTI Identifier:
1410186
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Ecology and Evolution
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 8; Journal Issue: 1; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2018-01-12 21:44:07; Journal ID: ISSN 2045-7758
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Menezes, Tiago, Romeiras, Maria M., de Sequeira, Miguel M., and Moura, Mónica. Phylogenetic relationships and phylogeography of relevant lineages within the complex Campanulaceae family in Macaronesia. United Kingdom: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/ece3.3640.
Menezes, Tiago, Romeiras, Maria M., de Sequeira, Miguel M., & Moura, Mónica. Phylogenetic relationships and phylogeography of relevant lineages within the complex Campanulaceae family in Macaronesia. United Kingdom. doi:10.1002/ece3.3640.
Menezes, Tiago, Romeiras, Maria M., de Sequeira, Miguel M., and Moura, Mónica. 2017. "Phylogenetic relationships and phylogeography of relevant lineages within the complex Campanulaceae family in Macaronesia". United Kingdom. doi:10.1002/ece3.3640.
@article{osti_1410186,
title = {Phylogenetic relationships and phylogeography of relevant lineages within the complex Campanulaceae family in Macaronesia},
author = {Menezes, Tiago and Romeiras, Maria M. and de Sequeira, Miguel M. and Moura, Mónica},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/ece3.3640},
journal = {Ecology and Evolution},
number = 1,
volume = 8,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1002/ece3.3640

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