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Title: Practical Application Limits of Fuel Cells and Batteries for Zero Emission Vessels

Abstract

Batteries and hydrogen fuel cells provide zero emission power at the point of use. They are studied as an alternative powerplant for maritime vessels by considering 14 case studies of various ship sizes and routes varying from small passenger vessels to the largest cargo ships. The method used was to compare the mass and volume of the required zero emission solution to the available mass and volume on an existing vessel considering its current engine and fuel storage systems. The results show that it is practically feasible to consider these zero emission technologies for most vessels in the world's fleet. Hydrogen fuel cells proved to be the most capable while battery systems showed an advantage for high power, short duration missions. The results provide a guide to ship designers to determine the most suitable types of zero emission powerplants to fit a ship based on its size and energy requirements.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Energy Innovation Dept.
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1410178
Report Number(s):
SAND-2017-12665
658940
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000; NA0003525
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
25 ENERGY STORAGE

Citation Formats

Minnehan, John J., and Pratt, Joseph William. Practical Application Limits of Fuel Cells and Batteries for Zero Emission Vessels. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1410178.
Minnehan, John J., & Pratt, Joseph William. Practical Application Limits of Fuel Cells and Batteries for Zero Emission Vessels. United States. doi:10.2172/1410178.
Minnehan, John J., and Pratt, Joseph William. 2017. "Practical Application Limits of Fuel Cells and Batteries for Zero Emission Vessels". United States. doi:10.2172/1410178. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1410178.
@article{osti_1410178,
title = {Practical Application Limits of Fuel Cells and Batteries for Zero Emission Vessels},
author = {Minnehan, John J. and Pratt, Joseph William},
abstractNote = {Batteries and hydrogen fuel cells provide zero emission power at the point of use. They are studied as an alternative powerplant for maritime vessels by considering 14 case studies of various ship sizes and routes varying from small passenger vessels to the largest cargo ships. The method used was to compare the mass and volume of the required zero emission solution to the available mass and volume on an existing vessel considering its current engine and fuel storage systems. The results show that it is practically feasible to consider these zero emission technologies for most vessels in the world's fleet. Hydrogen fuel cells proved to be the most capable while battery systems showed an advantage for high power, short duration missions. The results provide a guide to ship designers to determine the most suitable types of zero emission powerplants to fit a ship based on its size and energy requirements.},
doi = {10.2172/1410178},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Technical Report:

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