skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: On the Non-Metallicity of 2.2 nm Au 246 (SR) 80 Nanoclusters

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [1];  [1]
  1. Department of Chemistry, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh PA 15213 USA
  2. Department of Chemistry, Georgia State University, Atlanta GA 30302 USA
  3. Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1410128
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Angewandte Chemie
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 129; Journal Issue: 51; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-12-13 03:46:01; Journal ID: ISSN 0044-8249
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Country of Publication:
Germany
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Zhou, Meng, Zeng, Chenjie, Song, Yongbo, Padelford, Jonathan W., Wang, Gangli, Sfeir, Matthew Y., Higaki, Tatsuya, and Jin, Rongchao. On the Non-Metallicity of 2.2 nm Au 246 (SR) 80 Nanoclusters. Germany: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/ange.201709095.
Zhou, Meng, Zeng, Chenjie, Song, Yongbo, Padelford, Jonathan W., Wang, Gangli, Sfeir, Matthew Y., Higaki, Tatsuya, & Jin, Rongchao. On the Non-Metallicity of 2.2 nm Au 246 (SR) 80 Nanoclusters. Germany. doi:10.1002/ange.201709095.
Zhou, Meng, Zeng, Chenjie, Song, Yongbo, Padelford, Jonathan W., Wang, Gangli, Sfeir, Matthew Y., Higaki, Tatsuya, and Jin, Rongchao. 2017. "On the Non-Metallicity of 2.2 nm Au 246 (SR) 80 Nanoclusters". Germany. doi:10.1002/ange.201709095.
@article{osti_1410128,
title = {On the Non-Metallicity of 2.2 nm Au 246 (SR) 80 Nanoclusters},
author = {Zhou, Meng and Zeng, Chenjie and Song, Yongbo and Padelford, Jonathan W. and Wang, Gangli and Sfeir, Matthew Y. and Higaki, Tatsuya and Jin, Rongchao},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/ange.201709095},
journal = {Angewandte Chemie},
number = 51,
volume = 129,
place = {Germany},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on November 22, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

Save / Share:
  • Nearly monodispersed 30 {+-} 4 A Ir {sub approximately 900} nanoclusters have been prepared by hydrogen reduction of a polyoxoanion-supported Ir(I) complex, (Bu{sub 4}N){sub 5}Na{sub 3}[(1,5-COD)Ir-P{sub 2}W{sub 15}Nb{sub 3}O{sub 62}] (1,5-COD is 1,5-cycloctadiene), in acetone solution. The Ir {sub approximately 900} nanoclusters can be isolated as a black powder and redissolved in acetone or CH{sub 3}CN to give a stable, amber solution. Extensive characterizations of the Ir {sub approximately 900} nanoclusters have been made by means of TEM, electron diffraction, electrophoresis, ultracentrifugation solution molecular-weight measurements, fast-atom bombardment mass spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and IR and UV-vis spectroscopy; their average chemical compositionmore » is [Ir(O) approximately 900 (P{sub 4}W{sub 30}Nb{sub 6}O{sub 123}{sup 16-}) {sub approximately 60}] (Bu{sub 4}N) {sub approximately 660} Na {sub approximately 300}, in which the polyoxoanion is found to be in its oxidized and Nb-O-Nb bridged aggregate form, P{sub 4}W{sub 30}Nb{sub 6}O{sub 123}{sup 16-}. Electron diffraction studies show that the nanoclusters consist of cubic close-packed (ccp) Ir metal cores; electrophoresis and other techniques establish that the nanoclusters are stabilized in solution by the adsorption of the polyoxoanions on their outer surfaces. Smaller, ca. 20-A Ir-300 nanoclusters have also been reproducibly prepared and characterized from (Bu{sub 4}N){sub 5}Na{sub 3}[(1,5-COD)Ir-P{sub 2}W{sub 15}Nb{sub 3}O{sub 62}] and from (Bu{sub 4}N){sub 4-} Na{sub 2}[(1,5-COD)Ir-SiW{sub 9}Nb{sub 3}O{sub 40}] during the catalytic hydrogenation of cyclohexene. 58 refs., 13 figs.« less
  • The future of lab-on-a-chip devices for the synthesis of nanomaterials hinges on the successful development of high-throughput methods with better control over their size. While significant effort in this direction mainly focuses on developing “difficult to fabricate” complex microfluidic reactors, scant attention has been paid to the “easy to fabricate” and simple millifluidic systems that could provide the required control as well as high throughput. By utilizing numerical simulation of fluids within the millifluidic space at different flow rates, the results presented here show velocity profiles and residence time distributions similar to the case of microfluidics. By significantly reducing themore » residence time and residence time distribution, a continuous flow synthesis of ultrasmall copper nanoclusters (UCNCs) with exceptional colloidal stability is achieved. In-situ synchrotron-radiation-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) reveal that the as-prepared clusters are about 1 nm, which is further supported by transmission electron microscopy and UV–vis spectroscopy studies. The clusters reported here are the smallest ever produced using a lab-on-a-chip platform. When supported on silica, they are found to efficiently catalyze C–H oxidation reactions, hitherto unknown to be catalyzed by Cu. This work suggests that a millifluidic platform can be an inexpensive, versatile, easy-to-use, and powerful tool for nanoparticle synthesis in general, and more specifically for ultrasmall nanoclusters (UNCs).« less