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Title: Optical Mode Converters Final Report CRADA No. TC-0838-94

Abstract

The information age was maturing, and photonics was emerging as a significant technology with important'national security and commercial implications at the time of the CRADA. This was largely due to the vast information carrying capacity of optical beams and the availability of cheap.and effective optical fiber waveguides to guide the light. However, a major limitation to the widespread deployment of photonic systems was the high-cost (in an economic and performance sense) associated with coupling optical power between optoelectronic waveguide devices or between a device and an optical fiber. The problem was critical in the case of single-mode waveguide devices. Mitigating these costs would be a significant and pervasive enabler of the technology for a wide variety of applications that would have crucial defense and economic impact. The partners worked together to develop optical mode size converters on silicon substrates. Silicon was chosen because of its compatibility with the required photolithographic and micromachining techniques. By choosing silicon, these techniques could enable the close coupling of high-speed, high density silicon electronic circuitry to efficient low-cost photonics. The efficient coupling of electronics and photonics technologies would be important for many information age technologies. The joint nature of this project was intended to allowmore » HP to benefit from some unique LLNL capabilities, and LLNL would be in a position to learn from HP and enhance its value to fundamental DP missions. Although the CRADA began as a hardware development project to develop the mode converter, it evolved into a software development venture. LLNL and HP researchers examined literature, performed some preliminary calculations, and evaluated production trade-offs of several known techniques to determine the best candidates for an integrated system.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
  2. Hewlett-Packard Company, Palo Alto, CA (United States). Agilent Technologies
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1409998
Report Number(s):
LLNL-TR-741577
DOE Contract Number:  
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS

Citation Formats

Pocha, Michael D., and Carey, Kent. Optical Mode Converters Final Report CRADA No. TC-0838-94. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1409998.
Pocha, Michael D., & Carey, Kent. Optical Mode Converters Final Report CRADA No. TC-0838-94. United States. doi:10.2172/1409998.
Pocha, Michael D., and Carey, Kent. Thu . "Optical Mode Converters Final Report CRADA No. TC-0838-94". United States. doi:10.2172/1409998. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1409998.
@article{osti_1409998,
title = {Optical Mode Converters Final Report CRADA No. TC-0838-94},
author = {Pocha, Michael D. and Carey, Kent},
abstractNote = {The information age was maturing, and photonics was emerging as a significant technology with important'national security and commercial implications at the time of the CRADA. This was largely due to the vast information carrying capacity of optical beams and the availability of cheap.and effective optical fiber waveguides to guide the light. However, a major limitation to the widespread deployment of photonic systems was the high-cost (in an economic and performance sense) associated with coupling optical power between optoelectronic waveguide devices or between a device and an optical fiber. The problem was critical in the case of single-mode waveguide devices. Mitigating these costs would be a significant and pervasive enabler of the technology for a wide variety of applications that would have crucial defense and economic impact. The partners worked together to develop optical mode size converters on silicon substrates. Silicon was chosen because of its compatibility with the required photolithographic and micromachining techniques. By choosing silicon, these techniques could enable the close coupling of high-speed, high density silicon electronic circuitry to efficient low-cost photonics. The efficient coupling of electronics and photonics technologies would be important for many information age technologies. The joint nature of this project was intended to allow HP to benefit from some unique LLNL capabilities, and LLNL would be in a position to learn from HP and enhance its value to fundamental DP missions. Although the CRADA began as a hardware development project to develop the mode converter, it evolved into a software development venture. LLNL and HP researchers examined literature, performed some preliminary calculations, and evaluated production trade-offs of several known techniques to determine the best candidates for an integrated system.},
doi = {10.2172/1409998},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Nov 09 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Thu Nov 09 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

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