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Title: Measuring Cyanobacterial Metabolism in Biofilms with NanoSIMS Isotope Imaging and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM)

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1409973
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-728103
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Bio-protocol, vol. 7, no. 9, May 5, 2017, e2263
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Stuart, R K, Mayali, X, Thelen, M, Pett-Ridge, J, and Weber, P K. Measuring Cyanobacterial Metabolism in Biofilms with NanoSIMS Isotope Imaging and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Stuart, R K, Mayali, X, Thelen, M, Pett-Ridge, J, & Weber, P K. Measuring Cyanobacterial Metabolism in Biofilms with NanoSIMS Isotope Imaging and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). United States.
Stuart, R K, Mayali, X, Thelen, M, Pett-Ridge, J, and Weber, P K. Tue . "Measuring Cyanobacterial Metabolism in Biofilms with NanoSIMS Isotope Imaging and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM)". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1409973.
@article{osti_1409973,
title = {Measuring Cyanobacterial Metabolism in Biofilms with NanoSIMS Isotope Imaging and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM)},
author = {Stuart, R K and Mayali, X and Thelen, M and Pett-Ridge, J and Weber, P K},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {Bio-protocol, vol. 7, no. 9, May 5, 2017, e2263},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Mar 28 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue Mar 28 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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