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Title: Goldstar 2016 Interim Report: Brief Introduction to Urban Dispersion

Abstract

This section describes ways in which an urban environment can affect the distribution of airborne radiological material. In an urban area, winds at street level are significantly more variable and complex than the prevailing winds above the buildings. Elevated winds may be uniform and representative of the general flow over the surrounding area, but buildings influence the local flow such that the winds below the building heights vary significantly in location and time (Hanna et al 2006). For a release of material near an individual building, the complex effect of the building on the airflow may locally enhance the air concentration of released material in some regions near the building and reduce it in others compared to a release in open terrain. However, the overall effect of an individual building is to induce a rapid enlargement and dilution of an incident plume from an isolated source upwind of the building (Hosker 1984). A plume spreading through an urban environment of multiple buildings will experience enhanced mixing and greater spreading of the contaminant plume in both the vertical and horizontal directions, compared to the same release in open terrain.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1409943
Report Number(s):
LLNL-TR-730798
DOE Contract Number:  
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Neuscamman, Stephanie J. Goldstar 2016 Interim Report: Brief Introduction to Urban Dispersion. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1409943.
Neuscamman, Stephanie J. Goldstar 2016 Interim Report: Brief Introduction to Urban Dispersion. United States. doi:10.2172/1409943.
Neuscamman, Stephanie J. Sun . "Goldstar 2016 Interim Report: Brief Introduction to Urban Dispersion". United States. doi:10.2172/1409943. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1409943.
@article{osti_1409943,
title = {Goldstar 2016 Interim Report: Brief Introduction to Urban Dispersion},
author = {Neuscamman, Stephanie J.},
abstractNote = {This section describes ways in which an urban environment can affect the distribution of airborne radiological material. In an urban area, winds at street level are significantly more variable and complex than the prevailing winds above the buildings. Elevated winds may be uniform and representative of the general flow over the surrounding area, but buildings influence the local flow such that the winds below the building heights vary significantly in location and time (Hanna et al 2006). For a release of material near an individual building, the complex effect of the building on the airflow may locally enhance the air concentration of released material in some regions near the building and reduce it in others compared to a release in open terrain. However, the overall effect of an individual building is to induce a rapid enlargement and dilution of an incident plume from an isolated source upwind of the building (Hosker 1984). A plume spreading through an urban environment of multiple buildings will experience enhanced mixing and greater spreading of the contaminant plume in both the vertical and horizontal directions, compared to the same release in open terrain.},
doi = {10.2172/1409943},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun May 07 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sun May 07 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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