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Title: The ALPINE In Situ Infrastructure: Ascending from the Ashes of Strawman

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1409936
Report Number(s):
LLNL-CONF-737832
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at: In Situ Analysis and Visualization (ISAV) 2017, Denver, CO, United States, Nov 12 - Nov 12, 2017
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Larsen, M, Ahrens, J, Ayachit, U, Brugger, E, Childs, H, Geveci, B, and Harrison, C. The ALPINE In Situ Infrastructure: Ascending from the Ashes of Strawman. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1145/3144769.3144778.
Larsen, M, Ahrens, J, Ayachit, U, Brugger, E, Childs, H, Geveci, B, & Harrison, C. The ALPINE In Situ Infrastructure: Ascending from the Ashes of Strawman. United States. doi:10.1145/3144769.3144778.
Larsen, M, Ahrens, J, Ayachit, U, Brugger, E, Childs, H, Geveci, B, and Harrison, C. 2017. "The ALPINE In Situ Infrastructure: Ascending from the Ashes of Strawman". United States. doi:10.1145/3144769.3144778. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1409936.
@article{osti_1409936,
title = {The ALPINE In Situ Infrastructure: Ascending from the Ashes of Strawman},
author = {Larsen, M and Ahrens, J and Ayachit, U and Brugger, E and Childs, H and Geveci, B and Harrison, C},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1145/3144769.3144778},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 8
}

Conference:
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