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Title: Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Detector Optimization for Flash X-Ray Measurements

Abstract

Charge trapping, resulting in a decreased and spatially dependent electric field, has long been a concern for wide bandgap semiconductor detectors. While significant work has been performed to characterize this degradation at varying temperatures and radiation environments, this work concentrates upon examining the event-to-event response in a flash X-ray environment. The following work investigates if charge trapping is a problem for CZT detectors, with particular emphasis on flash X-ray radiation fields at cold temperatures. Results are compared to a non-flash radiation field, using an Am-241 alpha source and similar temperature transitions. Our ability to determine if a response change occurred was hampered by the repeatability of our flash X-ray systems; a small response change was observed with the Am-241 source. Due to contrast of these results, we are in the process of revisiting the Am-241 measurements in the presence of a high radiation environment. If the response change is more pronounced in the high radiation environment, a similar test will be performed in the flash X-ray environment.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1409799
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-30557
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; CZT; Charge Trapping; Flash X-ray

Citation Formats

Roecker, Caleb Daniel, and Schirato, Richard C. Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Detector Optimization for Flash X-Ray Measurements. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1409799.
Roecker, Caleb Daniel, & Schirato, Richard C. Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Detector Optimization for Flash X-Ray Measurements. United States. doi:10.2172/1409799.
Roecker, Caleb Daniel, and Schirato, Richard C. Fri . "Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Detector Optimization for Flash X-Ray Measurements". United States. doi:10.2172/1409799. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1409799.
@article{osti_1409799,
title = {Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Detector Optimization for Flash X-Ray Measurements},
author = {Roecker, Caleb Daniel and Schirato, Richard C.},
abstractNote = {Charge trapping, resulting in a decreased and spatially dependent electric field, has long been a concern for wide bandgap semiconductor detectors. While significant work has been performed to characterize this degradation at varying temperatures and radiation environments, this work concentrates upon examining the event-to-event response in a flash X-ray environment. The following work investigates if charge trapping is a problem for CZT detectors, with particular emphasis on flash X-ray radiation fields at cold temperatures. Results are compared to a non-flash radiation field, using an Am-241 alpha source and similar temperature transitions. Our ability to determine if a response change occurred was hampered by the repeatability of our flash X-ray systems; a small response change was observed with the Am-241 source. Due to contrast of these results, we are in the process of revisiting the Am-241 measurements in the presence of a high radiation environment. If the response change is more pronounced in the high radiation environment, a similar test will be performed in the flash X-ray environment.},
doi = {10.2172/1409799},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Nov 17 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Fri Nov 17 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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  • Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is evaluating design alternatives to improve the voltage regulation in our Flash X-Ray (FXR) accelerator cell and pulse-power system. The goal is to create a more mono-energetic electron beam that will create an x-ray source with a smaller spot-size. Studying the interaction of the beam and accelerator cell will generate improved designs for high-current accelerators at Livermore and elsewhere. When an electron beam crosses the energized gap of an accelerator cell, the electron energy is increased. However, the beam with the associated electromagnetic wave also looses a small amount of energy because of the increasedmore » impedance seen across the gap. The phenomenon is sometimes called beam loading. It can also be described as a beam-induced voltage at the gap which is time varying. This creates beam energy variations that we need to understand and control. A high-fidelity computer simulation of the beam and cell interaction has been completed to quantify the time varying induced voltage at the gap. The cell and pulse-power system was characterized using a Time-domain Reflectometry (TDR) measurement technique with a coaxial air-line to drive the cell gap. The beam-induced cell voltage is computed by convoluting the cell impedance with measured beam current. The voltage was checked against other measurements to validate the accuracy. The simulation results predicted that there are significant beam-induced gap voltage variations. Beam-induced voltages from different current profiles and cell impedances were simulated and compared. This allows us to predict the effect on voltage regulation for different design alternatives before making hardware changes and high-voltage testing. The beam-induced voltages are incorporated into a larger accelerator system-model to quantify their effect on total beam energy variations.« less
  • Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is currently investigating various approaches to minimize the x-ray source size on the Flash X-Ray (FXR) linear induction accelerator in order to improve x-ray flux and increase resolution for hydrodynamic radiography experiments. In order to effectively gauge improvements to final x-ray source size, a fast, robust, and accurate system for measuring the spot size is required. Timely feedback on x-ray source size allows new and improved accelerator tunes to be deployed and optimized within the limited run-time constraints of a production facility with a busy experimental schedule; in addition, time-resolved measurement capability allows the investigationmore » of not only the time-averaged source size, but also the evolution of the source size, centroid position, and x-ray dose throughout the 70 ns beam pulse. Combined with time-resolved measurements of electron beam parameters such as emittance, energy, and current, key limiting factors can be identified, modeled, and optimized for the best possible spot size. Roll-bar techniques are a widely used method for x-ray source size measurement, and have been the method of choice at FXR for many years. A thick bar of tungsten or other dense metal with a sharp edge is inserted into the path of the x-ray beam so as to heavily attenuate the lower half of the beam, resulting in a half-light, half-dark image as seen downstream of the roll-bar; by measuring the width of the transition from light to dark across the edge of the roll-bar, the source size can be deduced. For many years, film has been the imaging medium of choice for roll-bar measurements thanks to its high resolution, linear response, and excellent contrast ratio. Film measurements, however, are fairly cumbersome and require considerable setup and analysis time; moreover, with the continuing trend towards all-electronic measurement systems, film is becoming increasingly difficult and expensive to procure. Here, we shall discuss an x-ray source size measurement system which utilizes a traditional roll-bar setup combined with a high resolution gated CCD camera, fast-response organic plastic scintillator, and image processing and analysis software, which is executable on a standard PC running which is executable on a standard PC running LabVIEW and Matlab. Analysis time is reduced from several hours to several minutes, while our experimental results demonstrate good agreement with both traditional film-based roll-bar measurements as well as the entirely unrelated technique of x-ray pinhole camera measurements; in addition, our time-resolved measurements show a significant variation in source size throughout the 70 ns beam pulse, a phenomenon which requires further investigation and indicates the possibility of greatly improving final spot size.« less
  • ABS>A study was undertaken for ulhe Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory to investigate the applicability of selected semiconductor laser materials as detector and dosimeter phosphors in pulsed radiation environments capable of saturating conventional liquid and plastic scintillators. Samples of cadmium sulfide, yttrium aluminate, zinc sulfide, zinc oxide, zinc selenide, and aluminum oxide in powder form were exposed in ulhe laboratory to incidenul dose rates over the range of 2 x 10/sup 12/ to 4x 10/sup 14/ rads/sec to test their linearity, time response, and sulimulated light yield. Results indicate these light- emitting semiconductors are capable of responding to dose rates severalmore » decades above the level ( approximates 10/sup 11/ R/sec) at which plastic scintillators saturate. In addition, some of these materials show a greater light output and a faster time response than plastic scintillators. (auth)« less
  • The radiographic goal of the FXR Optimization Project is to generate an x-ray pulse with peak energy of 19 MeV, spot-size of 1.5 mm, a dose of 500 rad, and duration of 60 ns. The electrical objectives are to generate a 3 kA electron-beam and refine our 16 MV accelerator so that the voltage does not vary more than 1%-rms. In a multi-cell linear induction accelerator, like FXR, the timing of the acceleration pulses relative to the beam is critical. The pulses must be timed optimally so that a cell is at full voltage before the beam arrives and doesmore » not drop until the beam passes. In order to stay within the energy-variation budget, the synchronization between the cells and beam arrival must be controlled to a couple of nanoseconds. Therefore, temporal measurements must be accurate to a fraction of a nanosecond. FXR Optimization Project developed a one-giga-sample per second (gs/s) data acquisition system to record beam sensor data. Signal processing algorithms were written to determine cell timing with an uncertainty of a fraction of a nanosecond. However, the uncertainty in the sensor delay was still a few nanoseconds. This error had to be reduced if we are to improve the quality of the electron beam. Two types of sensors are used to align the cell voltage pulse against the beam current. The beam current is measured with resistive-wall sensors. The cell voltages are read with capacitive voltage monitors. Sensor delays can be traced to two mechanisms: (1) the sensors are not co-located at the beam and cell interaction points, and (2) the sensors have different length jumper cables and other components that connect them to the standard-length coaxial cables of the data acquisition system. Using the physical locations and dimensions of the sensor components, and the dielectric constant of the materials, delay times were computed. Relative to the cell voltage, the beam current was theoretically reporting late by 7.7 ns. Two experiments were performed to verify and refine the sensor delay correction. In the first experiment, the beam was allowed to drift through a cell that was not pulsed. The beam induces a potential into the cell that is read by the voltage monitor. Analysis of the data indicated that the beam sensor signal was likely 7.1 ns late. In the second experiment, the beam current is calculated from the injector diode voltage that is the sum of the cell voltages. A 7 ns correction produced a very good match between the signals from the two types of sensors. For simplicity, we selected a correction factor that advanced the current signals by 7 ns. This should reduce the uncertainty in the temporal measurements to less than 1 ns.« less
  • Knowing the electron beam parameters at the exit of an accelerator is critical for several reasons. Foremost is to optimize the application of the beam, which is flash radiography in the case of the FXR accelerator. The beam parameters not only determine the theoretical dose, x-ray spectrum, and radiograph resolution (spot size), they are required to calculate the final transport magnetic fields that focus the beam on the bremsstrahlung converter to achieve the theoretical limits. Equally important is the comparison of beam parameters to the design specifications. This comparison indicates the ''health'' of the accelerator, warning the operator when systemsmore » are deteriorating or failing. For an accelerator of the size and complexity of FXR, a large suite of diagnostics is normally employed to measure and/or infer beam parameters. These diagnostics are distributed throughout the accelerator and can require a large number of ''shots'' (measurements) to calculate a specific beam parameter. The OTR Emittance Diagnostic, however, has the potential to measure all but one of the beam parameters simultaneous at a specific location. Using measurements from a scan of a few shots, this final parameter can also be determined. Since first deployment, the OTR Emittance Diagnostic has been limited to measuring only one of the seven desired parameters, the beam's divergence. This report describes recent upgrades to the diagnostic that permit full realization of its potential.« less