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Title: Light Curves and Spectra from a Unimodal Core-collapse Supernova

Abstract

To assess the effectiveness of optical emission as a probe of spatial asymmetry in core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe), we apply in this paper the radiative transfer software SuperNu to a unimodal CCSN model. The SNSPH radiation hydrodynamics software was used to simulate an asymmetric explosion of a 16 $${M}_{\odot }$$ zero-age main-sequence binary star. The ejecta has 3.36 $${M}_{\odot }$$ with 0.024 $${M}_{\odot }$$ of radioactive 56Ni, with unipolar asymmetry along the z-axis. For 96 discrete angular views, we find a ratio between maximum and minimum peak total luminosities of ~1.36. The brightest light curves emerge from views orthogonal to the z-axis. Multigroup spectra from UV to IR are obtained. We find a shift in wavelength with viewing angle in a near-IR Ca ii emission feature, consistent with Ca being mostly in the unimode. We compare emission from the gray gamma-ray transfer in SuperNu and from the detailed gamma-ray transfer code Maverick. Relative to the optical light curves, the brightness of the gamma-ray emission is more monotonic with respect to viewing angle. UBVRI broadband light curves are also calculated. Parallel with the unimode, the U and B bands have excess luminosity at $$\gtrsim 10$$ days post-explosion, due to 56Ni on the unimode. Finally, we compare our CCSN model with SN 2002ap, which is thought to have a similar ejecta morphology.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  2. Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Flash Center for Computational Science. Dept. of Astronomy & Astrophysics
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1409756
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-20746
Journal ID: ISSN 1538-4357
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
The Astrophysical Journal (Online)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: The Astrophysical Journal (Online); Journal Volume: 845; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 1538-4357
Publisher:
Institute of Physics (IOP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS; hydrodynamics; radiative transfer; supernovae

Citation Formats

Wollaeger, Ryan T., Hungerford, Aimee L., Fryer, Chris L., Wollaber, Allan B., Rossum, Daniel R. van, and Even, Wesley. Light Curves and Spectra from a Unimodal Core-collapse Supernova. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/aa82bd.
Wollaeger, Ryan T., Hungerford, Aimee L., Fryer, Chris L., Wollaber, Allan B., Rossum, Daniel R. van, & Even, Wesley. Light Curves and Spectra from a Unimodal Core-collapse Supernova. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/aa82bd.
Wollaeger, Ryan T., Hungerford, Aimee L., Fryer, Chris L., Wollaber, Allan B., Rossum, Daniel R. van, and Even, Wesley. 2017. "Light Curves and Spectra from a Unimodal Core-collapse Supernova". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/aa82bd.
@article{osti_1409756,
title = {Light Curves and Spectra from a Unimodal Core-collapse Supernova},
author = {Wollaeger, Ryan T. and Hungerford, Aimee L. and Fryer, Chris L. and Wollaber, Allan B. and Rossum, Daniel R. van and Even, Wesley},
abstractNote = {To assess the effectiveness of optical emission as a probe of spatial asymmetry in core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe), we apply in this paper the radiative transfer software SuperNu to a unimodal CCSN model. The SNSPH radiation hydrodynamics software was used to simulate an asymmetric explosion of a 16 ${M}_{\odot }$ zero-age main-sequence binary star. The ejecta has 3.36 ${M}_{\odot }$ with 0.024 ${M}_{\odot }$ of radioactive 56Ni, with unipolar asymmetry along the z-axis. For 96 discrete angular views, we find a ratio between maximum and minimum peak total luminosities of ~1.36. The brightest light curves emerge from views orthogonal to the z-axis. Multigroup spectra from UV to IR are obtained. We find a shift in wavelength with viewing angle in a near-IR Ca ii emission feature, consistent with Ca being mostly in the unimode. We compare emission from the gray gamma-ray transfer in SuperNu and from the detailed gamma-ray transfer code Maverick. Relative to the optical light curves, the brightness of the gamma-ray emission is more monotonic with respect to viewing angle. UBVRI broadband light curves are also calculated. Parallel with the unimode, the U and B bands have excess luminosity at $\gtrsim 10$ days post-explosion, due to 56Ni on the unimode. Finally, we compare our CCSN model with SN 2002ap, which is thought to have a similar ejecta morphology.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/aa82bd},
journal = {The Astrophysical Journal (Online)},
number = 2,
volume = 845,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 8
}

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