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Title: Tuning Nb–Pt Interactions To Facilitate Fuel Cell Electrocatalysis

Abstract

High stability, availability of multiple oxidation states, and accessibility within a wide electrochemical window are the prime features of Nb that make it a favorable candidate for electrocatalysis, especially when it is combined with Pt. However, Nb has been used as a support in the form of oxides in all previously reported Pt–Nb electrocatalysts, and no Pt–Nb alloying phase has been demonstrated hitherto. Herein, we report a multifunctional Pt–Nb composite (PtNb/NbOx-C) where Nb exists both as an alloying component with Pt and as an oxide support and is synthesized by means of a simple wet chemical method. In this work, the Pt–Nb alloy phase has been firmly verified with the help of multiple spectroscopic methods. This allows for the experimental evidence of the theoretical prediction that Pt–Nb alloy interactions improve the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of Pt. In addition, such a combination of multiphase Nb brings up myriad features encompassing increased ORR durability, immunity to phosphate anion poisoning, enhanced hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) activity, and oxidative carbon monoxide (CO) stripping, making this electrocatalyst useful in multiple fuel cell systems.

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [3]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Northeastern University for Renewable Energy Technology, Department of Chemistry &, Chemical Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, United States
  2. Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, Michigan 48121, United States
  3. Shanghai Electrochemical Energy Devices Research Center, Department of Chemical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, People’s Republic of China
  4. Department of Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, United States
  5. ULVAC Technologies, Inc., 401 Griffin Brook Drive, Methuen, Massachusetts 01844, United States
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1409633
Report Number(s):
BNL-114685-2017-JA¿¿¿
Journal ID: ISSN 2155-5435
DOE Contract Number:
SC0012704
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: ACS Catalysis; Journal Volume: 7; Journal Issue: 8
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Citation Formats

Ghoshal, Shraboni, Jia, Qingying, Bates, Michael K., Li, Jingkun, Xu, Chunchuan, Gath, Kerrie, Yang, Jun, Waldecker, James, Che, Haiying, Liang, Wentao, Meng, Guangnan, Ma, Zi-Feng, and Mukerjee, Sanjeev. Tuning Nb–Pt Interactions To Facilitate Fuel Cell Electrocatalysis. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1021/acscatal.7b01061.
Ghoshal, Shraboni, Jia, Qingying, Bates, Michael K., Li, Jingkun, Xu, Chunchuan, Gath, Kerrie, Yang, Jun, Waldecker, James, Che, Haiying, Liang, Wentao, Meng, Guangnan, Ma, Zi-Feng, & Mukerjee, Sanjeev. Tuning Nb–Pt Interactions To Facilitate Fuel Cell Electrocatalysis. United States. doi:10.1021/acscatal.7b01061.
Ghoshal, Shraboni, Jia, Qingying, Bates, Michael K., Li, Jingkun, Xu, Chunchuan, Gath, Kerrie, Yang, Jun, Waldecker, James, Che, Haiying, Liang, Wentao, Meng, Guangnan, Ma, Zi-Feng, and Mukerjee, Sanjeev. 2017. "Tuning Nb–Pt Interactions To Facilitate Fuel Cell Electrocatalysis". United States. doi:10.1021/acscatal.7b01061.
@article{osti_1409633,
title = {Tuning Nb–Pt Interactions To Facilitate Fuel Cell Electrocatalysis},
author = {Ghoshal, Shraboni and Jia, Qingying and Bates, Michael K. and Li, Jingkun and Xu, Chunchuan and Gath, Kerrie and Yang, Jun and Waldecker, James and Che, Haiying and Liang, Wentao and Meng, Guangnan and Ma, Zi-Feng and Mukerjee, Sanjeev},
abstractNote = {High stability, availability of multiple oxidation states, and accessibility within a wide electrochemical window are the prime features of Nb that make it a favorable candidate for electrocatalysis, especially when it is combined with Pt. However, Nb has been used as a support in the form of oxides in all previously reported Pt–Nb electrocatalysts, and no Pt–Nb alloying phase has been demonstrated hitherto. Herein, we report a multifunctional Pt–Nb composite (PtNb/NbOx-C) where Nb exists both as an alloying component with Pt and as an oxide support and is synthesized by means of a simple wet chemical method. In this work, the Pt–Nb alloy phase has been firmly verified with the help of multiple spectroscopic methods. This allows for the experimental evidence of the theoretical prediction that Pt–Nb alloy interactions improve the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of Pt. In addition, such a combination of multiphase Nb brings up myriad features encompassing increased ORR durability, immunity to phosphate anion poisoning, enhanced hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) activity, and oxidative carbon monoxide (CO) stripping, making this electrocatalyst useful in multiple fuel cell systems.},
doi = {10.1021/acscatal.7b01061},
journal = {ACS Catalysis},
number = 8,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 6
}
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