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Title: Shear induced weakening of the hydrogen bonding lattice of the energetic material 5,5'-Hydrazinebistetrazole at high-pressure

Abstract

5,5'-Hydrazinebistetrazole (HBTA) has been studied by in-situ x-ray diffraction and vibrational spectroscopy to pressures near 25 GPa at room temperature. Analysis of the x-ray diffraction pattern of HBTA collected at ambient pressure and temperature revealed a monoclinic structure consistent with that previously reported. Under compression, the x-ray diffraction reveals little evidence of a phase transition over the pressure range studied. Slight anisotropy in response to compression was noted and the β angle decreased moderately, suggesting geometry modifications occur in the hydrogen bonding lattice and between neighboring HBTA molecules as a result of compression along the c axis. Blue shifts in the Infrared active N-H stretching modes were observed, implying a weakening of the hydrogen bond with compression. The weakening of the hydrogen bonding lattice with pressure may lead to an increase in the bending angle of the C-N=N-C bridge between the tetrazole rings and an increased overlap between the π-bonding orbitals. The Raman spectra showed a number of modes associated with H-N=N-H motions of the bridge become more prominent in the spectra under compression. Additionally, the possibility that the increased bend in the angle of the C-N=N-C bridge results from a shearing deformation is discussed.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1409598
Report Number(s):
BNL-114650-2017-JA¿¿¿
Journal ID: ISSN 0022-2860
DOE Contract Number:
SC0012704
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Molecular Structure; Journal Volume: 1129; Journal Issue: C
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Citation Formats

Ciezak-Jenkins, Jennifer A., and Jenkins, Timothy A. Shear induced weakening of the hydrogen bonding lattice of the energetic material 5,5'-Hydrazinebistetrazole at high-pressure. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.molstruc.2016.09.084.
Ciezak-Jenkins, Jennifer A., & Jenkins, Timothy A. Shear induced weakening of the hydrogen bonding lattice of the energetic material 5,5'-Hydrazinebistetrazole at high-pressure. United States. doi:10.1016/j.molstruc.2016.09.084.
Ciezak-Jenkins, Jennifer A., and Jenkins, Timothy A. Wed . "Shear induced weakening of the hydrogen bonding lattice of the energetic material 5,5'-Hydrazinebistetrazole at high-pressure". United States. doi:10.1016/j.molstruc.2016.09.084.
@article{osti_1409598,
title = {Shear induced weakening of the hydrogen bonding lattice of the energetic material 5,5'-Hydrazinebistetrazole at high-pressure},
author = {Ciezak-Jenkins, Jennifer A. and Jenkins, Timothy A.},
abstractNote = {5,5'-Hydrazinebistetrazole (HBTA) has been studied by in-situ x-ray diffraction and vibrational spectroscopy to pressures near 25 GPa at room temperature. Analysis of the x-ray diffraction pattern of HBTA collected at ambient pressure and temperature revealed a monoclinic structure consistent with that previously reported. Under compression, the x-ray diffraction reveals little evidence of a phase transition over the pressure range studied. Slight anisotropy in response to compression was noted and the β angle decreased moderately, suggesting geometry modifications occur in the hydrogen bonding lattice and between neighboring HBTA molecules as a result of compression along the c axis. Blue shifts in the Infrared active N-H stretching modes were observed, implying a weakening of the hydrogen bond with compression. The weakening of the hydrogen bonding lattice with pressure may lead to an increase in the bending angle of the C-N=N-C bridge between the tetrazole rings and an increased overlap between the π-bonding orbitals. The Raman spectra showed a number of modes associated with H-N=N-H motions of the bridge become more prominent in the spectra under compression. Additionally, the possibility that the increased bend in the angle of the C-N=N-C bridge results from a shearing deformation is discussed.},
doi = {10.1016/j.molstruc.2016.09.084},
journal = {Journal of Molecular Structure},
number = C,
volume = 1129,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
  • Raman spectroscopy was used to examine the high pressure-high temperature structural and chemical stability of an insensitive, high-performance energetic crystal – dihydroxylammonium 5,5'-bistetrazole-1,1'-diolate (TKX-50). The phase diagram was determined over 8 GPa and (293-760) K. Under isobaric heating, the melting/decomposition of TKX-50 is preceded by a transformation to two consecutive high-temperature intermediates; a lower-temperature intermediate – diammonium 5,5’-bistetrazole-1,1'-diolate, and a higher-temperature intermediate – dihydroxylammonium 5,5'-bistetrazolate and/or diammonium 5,5'-bistetrazolate. Pressure strongly increases the transition temperatures for these transformations and subsequent decomposition. As a result, significant increase in the chemical stability of TKX-50 and intermediates with pressure was attributed to a suppressionmore » of hydrogen-transfer.« less
  • The structural response of a novel, insensitive energetic crystal—dihydroxylammonium 5,5'-bistetrazole-1,1'-diolate (TKX-50)—was examined under high pressure. Using synchrotron single-crystal X-ray diffraction measurements, details of molecular, intermolecular, and crystal changes were determined to ~10 GPa to understand its structural stability. The experimental results showed that TKX-50 exhibits highly anisotropic compression and significantly lower volume compressibility than currently known energetic crystals. These results are found to be in general agreement with our previous predictions from the DFT calculations. Additionally, the experimental data revealed anomalous compression—an expansion of the unit cell along the a axis (negative linear compressibility, NLC) upon compression to ~3 GPa.more » The structural analyses demonstrated that this unusual effect, the first such observation in an energetic crystal, is a consequence of the highly anisotropic response of 3D motifs, comprised of two parallel anions [(C 2N 8O 2) 2–] linked with two cations [(NH 3OH) +] through four strong hydrogen bonds. The present results demonstrate that the structural stability of TKX-50 is controlled by the strong and highly anisotropic intermolecular interactions, and these may contribute to its shock insensitivity.« less
  • The structural response of a novel, insensitive energetic crystal—dihydroxylammonium 5,5'-bistetrazole-1,1'-diolate (TKX-50)—was examined under high pressure. Using synchrotron single-crystal X-ray diffraction measurements, details of molecular, intermolecular, and crystal changes were determined to ~10 GPa to understand its structural stability. The experimental results showed that TKX-50 exhibits highly anisotropic compression and significantly lower volume compressibility than currently known energetic crystals. These results are found to be in general agreement with our previous predictions from the DFT calculations. Additionally, the experimental data revealed anomalous compression—an expansion of the unit cell along the a axis (negative linear compressibility, NLC) upon compression to ~3 GPa.more » The structural analyses demonstrated that this unusual effect, the first such observation in an energetic crystal, is a consequence of the highly anisotropic response of 3D motifs, comprised of two parallel anions [(C 2N 8O 2) 2–] linked with two cations [(NH 3OH) +] through four strong hydrogen bonds. Finally, the present results demonstrate that the structural stability of TKX-50 is controlled by the strong and highly anisotropic intermolecular interactions, and these may contribute to its shock insensitivity.« less