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Title: An allosteric site in the T-cell receptor Cβ domain plays a critical signalling role

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ORCiD logo; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1409524
Report Number(s):
BNL-114576-2017-JA¿¿¿
Journal ID: ISSN 2041-1723
DOE Contract Number:
SC0012704
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Nature Communications; Journal Volume: 8
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Natarajan, Kannan, McShan, Andrew C., Jiang, Jiansheng, Kumirov, Vlad K., Wang, Rui, Zhao, Huaying, Schuck, Peter, Tilahun, Mulualem E., Boyd, Lisa F., Ying, Jinfa, Bax, Ad, Margulies, David H., and Sgourakis, Nikolaos G. An allosteric site in the T-cell receptor Cβ domain plays a critical signalling role. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1038/ncomms15260.
Natarajan, Kannan, McShan, Andrew C., Jiang, Jiansheng, Kumirov, Vlad K., Wang, Rui, Zhao, Huaying, Schuck, Peter, Tilahun, Mulualem E., Boyd, Lisa F., Ying, Jinfa, Bax, Ad, Margulies, David H., & Sgourakis, Nikolaos G. An allosteric site in the T-cell receptor Cβ domain plays a critical signalling role. United States. doi:10.1038/ncomms15260.
Natarajan, Kannan, McShan, Andrew C., Jiang, Jiansheng, Kumirov, Vlad K., Wang, Rui, Zhao, Huaying, Schuck, Peter, Tilahun, Mulualem E., Boyd, Lisa F., Ying, Jinfa, Bax, Ad, Margulies, David H., and Sgourakis, Nikolaos G. 2017. "An allosteric site in the T-cell receptor Cβ domain plays a critical signalling role". United States. doi:10.1038/ncomms15260.
@article{osti_1409524,
title = {An allosteric site in the T-cell receptor Cβ domain plays a critical signalling role},
author = {Natarajan, Kannan and McShan, Andrew C. and Jiang, Jiansheng and Kumirov, Vlad K. and Wang, Rui and Zhao, Huaying and Schuck, Peter and Tilahun, Mulualem E. and Boyd, Lisa F. and Ying, Jinfa and Bax, Ad and Margulies, David H. and Sgourakis, Nikolaos G.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1038/ncomms15260},
journal = {Nature Communications},
number = ,
volume = 8,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 5
}
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