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Title: Nuclear magnetic resonance probe head design for precision strain control

Abstract

Here, we present the design and construction of an NMR probe to investigate single crystals under strain at cryogenic temperatures. The probe head incorporates a piezoelectric-based apparatus from Razorbill Instruments that enables both compressive and tensile strain tuning up to strain values on the order of 0.3% with a precision of 0.001%. 75As NMR in BaFe 2As 2 reveals large changes to the electric field gradient and indicates that the strain is homogeneous to within 16% over the volume of the NMR coil.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [3]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)
  2. TU Dresden, Dresden (Germany)
  3. Ames Lab. and Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1409367
Report Number(s):
IS-J-9498
Journal ID: ISSN 0034-6748; TRN: US1703196
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-07CH11358; NA0002908
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Review of Scientific Instruments
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 88; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 0034-6748
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; NMR; strain

Citation Formats

Kissikov, T., Sarkar, R., Bush, B. T., Lawson, M., Canfield, P. C., and Curro, N. J. Nuclear magnetic resonance probe head design for precision strain control. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1063/1.5002631.
Kissikov, T., Sarkar, R., Bush, B. T., Lawson, M., Canfield, P. C., & Curro, N. J. Nuclear magnetic resonance probe head design for precision strain control. United States. doi:10.1063/1.5002631.
Kissikov, T., Sarkar, R., Bush, B. T., Lawson, M., Canfield, P. C., and Curro, N. J. 2017. "Nuclear magnetic resonance probe head design for precision strain control". United States. doi:10.1063/1.5002631.
@article{osti_1409367,
title = {Nuclear magnetic resonance probe head design for precision strain control},
author = {Kissikov, T. and Sarkar, R. and Bush, B. T. and Lawson, M. and Canfield, P. C. and Curro, N. J.},
abstractNote = {Here, we present the design and construction of an NMR probe to investigate single crystals under strain at cryogenic temperatures. The probe head incorporates a piezoelectric-based apparatus from Razorbill Instruments that enables both compressive and tensile strain tuning up to strain values on the order of 0.3% with a precision of 0.001%. 75As NMR in BaFe2As2 reveals large changes to the electric field gradient and indicates that the strain is homogeneous to within 16% over the volume of the NMR coil.},
doi = {10.1063/1.5002631},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 10,
volume = 88,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on October 3, 2018
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