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Title: Annual Report of Monitoring at Barnes, Kansas, in 2016

Abstract

In 2006, the CCC/USDA assumed responsibility for the site investigation relating to potential carbon tetrachloride contamination. Initially, the CCC/USDA developed and implemented a work plan for targeted groundwater sampling and monitoring well installation (KDHE 2009). The investigation and subsequent monitoring (Argonne 2008a-d, 2009a,b, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2015a,b, 2016) were performed by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The reports of environmental investigations at Barnes are summarized.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
OSTI Identifier:
1409219
Report Number(s):
ANL/EVS/AGEM/TR-17-07
138479
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS

Citation Formats

LaFreniere, Lorraine M. Annual Report of Monitoring at Barnes, Kansas, in 2016. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1409219.
LaFreniere, Lorraine M. Annual Report of Monitoring at Barnes, Kansas, in 2016. United States. doi:10.2172/1409219.
LaFreniere, Lorraine M. Mon . "Annual Report of Monitoring at Barnes, Kansas, in 2016". United States. doi:10.2172/1409219. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1409219.
@article{osti_1409219,
title = {Annual Report of Monitoring at Barnes, Kansas, in 2016},
author = {LaFreniere, Lorraine M.},
abstractNote = {In 2006, the CCC/USDA assumed responsibility for the site investigation relating to potential carbon tetrachloride contamination. Initially, the CCC/USDA developed and implemented a work plan for targeted groundwater sampling and monitoring well installation (KDHE 2009). The investigation and subsequent monitoring (Argonne 2008a-d, 2009a,b, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2015a,b, 2016) were performed by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The reports of environmental investigations at Barnes are summarized.},
doi = {10.2172/1409219},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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  • The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility at Barnes, Kansas, during most of the interval 1949-1974. Carbon tetrachloride contamination was initially detected in 1986 in the town's public water supply wells. In 2006-2007, the CCC/USDA conducted a comprehensive targeted investigation at and near its former property in Barnes to characterize this contamination. Those results were reported previously (Argonne 2008a). In November 2007, the CCC/USDA began quarterly groundwater monitoring at Barnes. The monitoring is being conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with the recommendations made inmore » the report for the 2006-2007 targeted investigation (Argonne 2008a). The objective is to monitor the carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Barnes. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 28 individual monitoring wells (at 19 distinct locations), 2 public water supply wells, and 1 private well (Figure 1.1). The results of the 2006-2007 targeted investigation and the subsequent monitoring events (Argonne 2008a-d, 2009a,b) demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at levels exceeding the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) of 5.0 {micro}g/L for this compound. The contaminant plume appears to extend from the former CCC/USDA property northwestward, toward the Barnes public water supply wells. Information obtained during the 2006-2007 investigation indicates that at least one other potential source might have contributed to the groundwater contaminant plume (Argonne 2008a). The former agriculture building owned by the local school district, located immediately east of well PWS3, is also a potential source of the contamination. This current report presents the results of the seventh quarterly monitoring event, conducted in September-October, and also sampling of only the public wells in December 2009. During the September-October quarterly event, low-flow sampling methods were used to purge and sample all wells. This was the seventh event at Barnes during which the low-flow sampling method was used. After the September-October 2009 quarterly sampling event, the KDHE (2009) approved a change in the sampling frequency for the monitoring wells from quarterly to twice yearly. Quarterly sampling is to continue for the public water supply wells. Accordingly, in December 2009, only the public wells were sampled. All results for the six-month period July-December 2009 are reported here.« less
  • The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility at Barnes, Kansas, in 1949-1974. Carbon tetrachloride contamination was initially detected in 1986 in the town's public water supply wells. In 2006-2007, the CCC/USDA conducted a comprehensive targeted investigation at and near its former property in Barnes to characterize this contamination. Those results were reported previously (Argonne 2008a). The results of that investigation indicated that carbon tetrachloride contamination is present in groundwater at low to moderate levels in the vicinity of the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility. Information obtained during the 2006-2007 investigation alsomore » indicated that at least one other potential source might have contributed to the groundwater contaminant plume (Argonne 2008a). The former agriculture building owned by the local school district, located immediately east of well PWS3, is also a potential source of the contamination. In November 2007, the CCC/USDA began periodic groundwater monitoring at Barnes. The monitoring is being conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, under the direction of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The objective is to monitor the carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Barnes. Through 2010, sampling was conducted in a network of 28 individual monitoring wells (at 19 distinct locations), 2 public water supply wells, and 1 private well (Figure 1.1). The results of the 2006-2007 targeted investigation and the subsequent monitoring events (Argonne 2008a-d, 2009a,b, 2010) demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) of 5.0 {micro}g/L for this compound. The contaminant plume appears to extend from the former CCC/USDA property northwestward, toward the Barnes public water supply wells. Long-term monitoring of the groundwater levels and the contaminant distribution has confirmed that pumping of the public water supply wells affects the direction of groundwater flow. When these wells are not pumping, the direction of groundwater flow is to the northeast. However, when they are pumping, groundwater flow is directed to the northwest, toward the public wells. A contingency interim measure (Argonne 2009c) has been approved by the KDHE (2009) and will be implemented if the two operating public water supply wells become contaminated at levels above the RBSL of 5.0 {micro}g/L for carbon tetrachloride. This current report presents the results of monitoring conducted in 2010. Sampling of the monitoring well network was conducted in March-April 2010 and September 2010. In addition, the two operating public water supply wells were sampled in June 2010 and December 2010. On the basis of an evaluation of the data collected in 2006-2009 (Argonne 2010), including a trend analysis of the site contamination and its migration, the KDHE (2010) concurred that future monitoring will occur on an annual basis, with twice-yearly sampling of the two public water supply wells in service (conducted in cooperation with the city). The KDHE (2010) also agreed to decrease the number wells to be sampled in the future, as discussed in Section 5.« less
  • Barnes, Kansas, is a small rural community (population approximately 150) located in Washington County, in north-central Kansas (Figure 1.1). The city lies in a transition zone between the Flint Hills and the glaciated region. The area's topography consists of gently sloping hills of Pleistocene loess (< 20 ft) overlying a shale unit and interbedded shale, limestone, and siltstone of the Permian Chase Group. Groundwater for the public water supply is obtained from wells PWS2 and PWS3 at reported depths of 155 ft and 160 ft, respectively, located in the northwestern portion of the city. The water is produced from themore » bedrock aquifer of the Chase Group. Section 2 summarizes of the hydrogeologic conceptual site model. The findings of the monitoring events at Barnes in 2011 continued to support the following previous conclusions: (1) Measurements of groundwater levels obtained manually and through the use of automatic recorders have consistently indicated that the flow direction is strongly influenced by pumping of the public water supply wells. The results have demonstrated an apparent groundwater flow direction to the northeast when the public wells are not pumping and a northwesterly groundwater flow trend when the public wells are pumping. (2) Evaluation of manual water level measurements and carbon tetrachloride concentrations continues to suggest that three vertically distinguishable aquifer zones are present at Barnes: shallow, intermediate, and deep (Table 4.1). The highest concentration of carbon tetrachloride occurs in the intermediate zone, in wells near the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility. Lower concentrations have been detected in the deep aquifer zone (where the public water supply wells are screened), and no carbon tetrachloride has been detected in the shallow zone. (3) The conceptual model of the groundwater flow system at Barnes, as postulated on the basis of the accumulated results, suggests that the observed vertical hydraulic gradients and higher carbon tetrachloride concentrations in the intermediate zone might reflect generally lower permeability and hence less effective groundwater and contaminant migration in the intermediate zone than in the deep aquifer zone. (4) As it has since March 2008, intermediate-zone well MW10S, in the eastern portion of the former CCC/USDA facility, contained the highest concentrations of carbon tetrachloride. (5) Overall, the lateral distribution of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater in 2011 is similar to the distribution during previous sampling events. The accumulated data, including a trend analysis conducted in 2009, indicate stable contaminant concentrations, with no imminent impact to the public wells.« less
  • Barnes, Kansas, is a small rural community (population approximately 150) located in Washington County, in north-central Kansas (Figure 1.1). Barnes is located in Section 9, Township 4 South, Range 5 East, at approximate latitude 39°43'0'' north and longitude 96°52'25'' west (USGS 1968). The city lies in a transition zone between the Flint Hills and the glaciated region. The area’s topography consists of gently sloping hills of Pleistocene loess (< 20 ft) overlying a shale unit and interbedded shale, limestone, and siltstone of the Permian Chase Group. Groundwater for the public water supply is obtained from wells PWS2 and PWS3 atmore » reported depths of 155 ft and 160 ft, respectively, located in the northwestern portion of the city. The water is produced from the bedrock aquifer of the Chase Group. Section 2 summarizes the hydrogeologic conceptual site model. This report summarizes findings for groundwater inspection in Barnes.« less