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Title: Evaluating Indicators and Life Cycle Inventories for Processes in Early Stages of Technical Readiness

Abstract

This presentation examines different methods for analyzing manufacturing processes in the early stages of technical readiness. Before developers know much detail about their processes, it is valuable to apply various assessments to evaluate their performance. One type of assessment evaluates performance indicators to describe how closely processes approach desirable objectives. Another type of assessment determines the life cycle inventories (LCI) of inputs and outputs for processes, where for a functional unit of product, the user evaluates the resources used and the releases to the environment. These results can be compared to similar processes or combined with the LCI of other processes to examine up-and down-stream chemicals. The inventory also provides a listing of the up-stream chemicals, which permits study of the whole life cycle. Performance indicators are evaluated in this presentation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's GREENSCOPE (Gauging Reaction Effectiveness for ENvironmental Sustainability with a multi-Objective Process Evaluator) methodology, which evaluates processes in four areas: Environment, Energy, Economics, and Efficiency. The method develops relative scores for indicators that allow comparisons across various technologies. In this contribution, two conversion pathways for producing cellulosic ethanol from biomass, via thermochemical and biochemical routes, are studied. The information developed from the indicators andmore » LCI can be used to inform the process design and the potential life cycle effects of up- and down-stream chemicals.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
  2. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Bioenergy Technologies Office (EE-3B)
OSTI Identifier:
1409164
Report Number(s):
NREL/PR-5100-70426
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at the 2017 AIChE Annual Meeting, 29 October - 3 November 2017, Minneapolis, Minnesota
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; life cycle assessment; LCA; cellulosic ethanol; biomass; thermochemical routes; biochemical routes; life cycle inventories; LCI

Citation Formats

Tan, Eric C, Smith, Raymond, and Ruiz-Mercado, Gerardo. Evaluating Indicators and Life Cycle Inventories for Processes in Early Stages of Technical Readiness. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Tan, Eric C, Smith, Raymond, & Ruiz-Mercado, Gerardo. Evaluating Indicators and Life Cycle Inventories for Processes in Early Stages of Technical Readiness. United States.
Tan, Eric C, Smith, Raymond, and Ruiz-Mercado, Gerardo. 2017. "Evaluating Indicators and Life Cycle Inventories for Processes in Early Stages of Technical Readiness". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1409164.
@article{osti_1409164,
title = {Evaluating Indicators and Life Cycle Inventories for Processes in Early Stages of Technical Readiness},
author = {Tan, Eric C and Smith, Raymond and Ruiz-Mercado, Gerardo},
abstractNote = {This presentation examines different methods for analyzing manufacturing processes in the early stages of technical readiness. Before developers know much detail about their processes, it is valuable to apply various assessments to evaluate their performance. One type of assessment evaluates performance indicators to describe how closely processes approach desirable objectives. Another type of assessment determines the life cycle inventories (LCI) of inputs and outputs for processes, where for a functional unit of product, the user evaluates the resources used and the releases to the environment. These results can be compared to similar processes or combined with the LCI of other processes to examine up-and down-stream chemicals. The inventory also provides a listing of the up-stream chemicals, which permits study of the whole life cycle. Performance indicators are evaluated in this presentation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's GREENSCOPE (Gauging Reaction Effectiveness for ENvironmental Sustainability with a multi-Objective Process Evaluator) methodology, which evaluates processes in four areas: Environment, Energy, Economics, and Efficiency. The method develops relative scores for indicators that allow comparisons across various technologies. In this contribution, two conversion pathways for producing cellulosic ethanol from biomass, via thermochemical and biochemical routes, are studied. The information developed from the indicators and LCI can be used to inform the process design and the potential life cycle effects of up- and down-stream chemicals.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Conference:
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