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Title: Improving the Representation of Polar Snow and Firn in the Community Earth System Model: IMPROVING POLAR SNOW AND FIRN IN CESM

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [3]; ORCiD logo [3]; ORCiD logo [4]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht The Netherlands
  2. Group T-3, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos NM USA, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder CO USA
  3. National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder CO USA
  4. National Snow and Ice Data Center, Boulder CO USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1409119
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Advances in Modeling Earth Systems
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 9; Journal Issue: 7; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-12-23 04:11:23; Journal ID: ISSN 1942-2466
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

van Kampenhout, Leonardus, Lenaerts, Jan T. M., Lipscomb, William H., Sacks, William J., Lawrence, David M., Slater, Andrew G., and van den Broeke, Michiel R. Improving the Representation of Polar Snow and Firn in the Community Earth System Model: IMPROVING POLAR SNOW AND FIRN IN CESM. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/2017MS000988.
van Kampenhout, Leonardus, Lenaerts, Jan T. M., Lipscomb, William H., Sacks, William J., Lawrence, David M., Slater, Andrew G., & van den Broeke, Michiel R. Improving the Representation of Polar Snow and Firn in the Community Earth System Model: IMPROVING POLAR SNOW AND FIRN IN CESM. United States. doi:10.1002/2017MS000988.
van Kampenhout, Leonardus, Lenaerts, Jan T. M., Lipscomb, William H., Sacks, William J., Lawrence, David M., Slater, Andrew G., and van den Broeke, Michiel R. 2017. "Improving the Representation of Polar Snow and Firn in the Community Earth System Model: IMPROVING POLAR SNOW AND FIRN IN CESM". United States. doi:10.1002/2017MS000988.
@article{osti_1409119,
title = {Improving the Representation of Polar Snow and Firn in the Community Earth System Model: IMPROVING POLAR SNOW AND FIRN IN CESM},
author = {van Kampenhout, Leonardus and Lenaerts, Jan T. M. and Lipscomb, William H. and Sacks, William J. and Lawrence, David M. and Slater, Andrew G. and van den Broeke, Michiel R.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/2017MS000988},
journal = {Journal of Advances in Modeling Earth Systems},
number = 7,
volume = 9,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1002/2017MS000988

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