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Title: Accelerating the deployment of energy efficient and renewable energy technologies in South Africa

Abstract

Purpose of the project was to accelerate the deployment of energy efficient and renewable energy technologies in South Africa. Activities were undertaken to reduce barriers to deployment by improving product awareness for the South African market; market and policy intelligence for U.S. manufacturers; product/service availability; local technical capacity at the workforce, policymaker and expert levels; and ease of conducting business for these technologies/services in the South African market.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Trust for Conservation Innovation, San Francisco, CA (United States). Global Cool Cities Alliance (GCCA)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Trust for Conservation Innovation, San Francisco, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1409037
Report Number(s):
DOE-TCI-6514
DOE Contract Number:
EE0006514
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY

Citation Formats

Shickman, Kurt. Accelerating the deployment of energy efficient and renewable energy technologies in South Africa. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1409037.
Shickman, Kurt. Accelerating the deployment of energy efficient and renewable energy technologies in South Africa. United States. doi:10.2172/1409037.
Shickman, Kurt. Mon . "Accelerating the deployment of energy efficient and renewable energy technologies in South Africa". United States. doi:10.2172/1409037. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1409037.
@article{osti_1409037,
title = {Accelerating the deployment of energy efficient and renewable energy technologies in South Africa},
author = {Shickman, Kurt},
abstractNote = {Purpose of the project was to accelerate the deployment of energy efficient and renewable energy technologies in South Africa. Activities were undertaken to reduce barriers to deployment by improving product awareness for the South African market; market and policy intelligence for U.S. manufacturers; product/service availability; local technical capacity at the workforce, policymaker and expert levels; and ease of conducting business for these technologies/services in the South African market.},
doi = {10.2172/1409037},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Feb 13 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Mon Feb 13 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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