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Title: The Barriers to Acceptance of Plug-in Electric Vehicles: 2017 Update

Abstract

Vehicle manufacturers, government agencies, universities, private researchers, and organizations worldwide are pursuing advanced vehicle technologies that aim to reduce the consumption of petroleum in the forms of gasoline and diesel. Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) are one such technology. This report, an update to the previous version published in December 2016, details findings from a study in February 2017 of broad American public sentiments toward issues that surround PEVs. This report is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Office in alignment with its mission to develop and deploy these technologies to improve energy security, enhance mobility flexibility, reduce transportation costs, and increase environmental sustainability.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (EE-3V)
OSTI Identifier:
1408997
Report Number(s):
NREL/TP-5400-70371
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION; 33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; electric vehicle; plug-in electric vehicle; PEV; consumer sentiments; consumer views

Citation Formats

Singer, Mark R. The Barriers to Acceptance of Plug-in Electric Vehicles: 2017 Update. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1408997.
Singer, Mark R. The Barriers to Acceptance of Plug-in Electric Vehicles: 2017 Update. United States. doi:10.2172/1408997.
Singer, Mark R. 2017. "The Barriers to Acceptance of Plug-in Electric Vehicles: 2017 Update". United States. doi:10.2172/1408997. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1408997.
@article{osti_1408997,
title = {The Barriers to Acceptance of Plug-in Electric Vehicles: 2017 Update},
author = {Singer, Mark R.},
abstractNote = {Vehicle manufacturers, government agencies, universities, private researchers, and organizations worldwide are pursuing advanced vehicle technologies that aim to reduce the consumption of petroleum in the forms of gasoline and diesel. Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) are one such technology. This report, an update to the previous version published in December 2016, details findings from a study in February 2017 of broad American public sentiments toward issues that surround PEVs. This report is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Office in alignment with its mission to develop and deploy these technologies to improve energy security, enhance mobility flexibility, reduce transportation costs, and increase environmental sustainability.},
doi = {10.2172/1408997},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Technical Report:

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