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Title: FY2017 Report on NISC Measurements and Detector Simulations

Abstract

FY17 work focused on automation, both of the measurement analysis and comparison of simulations. The experimental apparatus was relocated and weeks of continuous measurements of the spontaneous fission source 252Cf was performed. Programs were developed to automate the conversion of measurements into ROOT data framework files with a simple terminal input. The complete analysis of the measurement (which includes energy calibration and the identification of correlated counts) can now be completed with a documented process which involves one simple execution line as well. Finally, the hurdles of slow MCNP simulations resulting in low simulation statistics have been overcome with the generation of multi-run suites which make use of the highperformance computing resources at LANL. Preliminary comparisons of measurements and simulations have been performed and will be the focus of FY18 work.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1408860
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-30419
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

Citation Formats

Andrews, Madison Theresa, Meierbachtol, Krista Cruse, and Jordan, Tyler Alexander. FY2017 Report on NISC Measurements and Detector Simulations. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1408860.
Andrews, Madison Theresa, Meierbachtol, Krista Cruse, & Jordan, Tyler Alexander. FY2017 Report on NISC Measurements and Detector Simulations. United States. doi:10.2172/1408860.
Andrews, Madison Theresa, Meierbachtol, Krista Cruse, and Jordan, Tyler Alexander. 2017. "FY2017 Report on NISC Measurements and Detector Simulations". United States. doi:10.2172/1408860. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1408860.
@article{osti_1408860,
title = {FY2017 Report on NISC Measurements and Detector Simulations},
author = {Andrews, Madison Theresa and Meierbachtol, Krista Cruse and Jordan, Tyler Alexander},
abstractNote = {FY17 work focused on automation, both of the measurement analysis and comparison of simulations. The experimental apparatus was relocated and weeks of continuous measurements of the spontaneous fission source 252Cf was performed. Programs were developed to automate the conversion of measurements into ROOT data framework files with a simple terminal input. The complete analysis of the measurement (which includes energy calibration and the identification of correlated counts) can now be completed with a documented process which involves one simple execution line as well. Finally, the hurdles of slow MCNP simulations resulting in low simulation statistics have been overcome with the generation of multi-run suites which make use of the highperformance computing resources at LANL. Preliminary comparisons of measurements and simulations have been performed and will be the focus of FY18 work.},
doi = {10.2172/1408860},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Technical Report:

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