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Title: Identifying and Correcting Timing Errors at Seismic Stations in and around Iran

Abstract

A fundamental component of seismic research is the use of phase arrival times, which are central to event location, Earth model development, and phase identification, as well as derived products. Hence, the accuracy of arrival times is crucial. However, errors in the timing of seismic waveforms and the arrival times based on them may go unidentified by the end user, particularly when seismic data are shared between different organizations. Here, we present a method used to analyze travel-time residuals for stations in and around Iran to identify time periods that are likely to contain station timing problems. For the 14 stations with the strongest evidence of timing errors lasting one month or longer, timing corrections are proposed to address the problematic time periods. Finally, two additional stations are identified with incorrect locations in the International Registry of Seismograph Stations, and one is found to have erroneously reported arrival times in 2011.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  2. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1408838
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-24689
Journal ID: ISSN 0895-0695; TRN: US1703180
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Seismological Research Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 88; Journal Issue: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 0895-0695
Publisher:
Seismological Society of America
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES

Citation Formats

Syracuse, Ellen Marie, Phillips, William Scott, Maceira, Monica, and Begnaud, Michael Lee. Identifying and Correcting Timing Errors at Seismic Stations in and around Iran. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1785/0220170113.
Syracuse, Ellen Marie, Phillips, William Scott, Maceira, Monica, & Begnaud, Michael Lee. Identifying and Correcting Timing Errors at Seismic Stations in and around Iran. United States. doi:10.1785/0220170113.
Syracuse, Ellen Marie, Phillips, William Scott, Maceira, Monica, and Begnaud, Michael Lee. 2017. "Identifying and Correcting Timing Errors at Seismic Stations in and around Iran". United States. doi:10.1785/0220170113.
@article{osti_1408838,
title = {Identifying and Correcting Timing Errors at Seismic Stations in and around Iran},
author = {Syracuse, Ellen Marie and Phillips, William Scott and Maceira, Monica and Begnaud, Michael Lee},
abstractNote = {A fundamental component of seismic research is the use of phase arrival times, which are central to event location, Earth model development, and phase identification, as well as derived products. Hence, the accuracy of arrival times is crucial. However, errors in the timing of seismic waveforms and the arrival times based on them may go unidentified by the end user, particularly when seismic data are shared between different organizations. Here, we present a method used to analyze travel-time residuals for stations in and around Iran to identify time periods that are likely to contain station timing problems. For the 14 stations with the strongest evidence of timing errors lasting one month or longer, timing corrections are proposed to address the problematic time periods. Finally, two additional stations are identified with incorrect locations in the International Registry of Seismograph Stations, and one is found to have erroneously reported arrival times in 2011.},
doi = {10.1785/0220170113},
journal = {Seismological Research Letters},
number = 6,
volume = 88,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 9
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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