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Title: SCIDAC Center for simulation of wave particle interactions CompX participation

Abstract

Harnessing the energy that is released in fusion reactions would provide a safe and abundant source of power to meet the growing energy needs of the world population. The next step toward the development of fusion as a practical energy source is the construction of ITER, a device capable of producing and controlling the high performance plasma required for self-sustaining fusion reactions, or “burning” plasma. The input power required to drive the ITER plasma into the burning regime will be supplied primarily with a combination of external power from radio frequency waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies and energetic ions from neutral beam injection sources, in addition to internally generated Ohmic heating from the induced plasma current that also serves to create the magnetic equilibrium for the discharge. The ITER project is a large multi-billion dollar international project in which the US participates. The success of the ITER project depends critically on the ability to create and maintain burning plasma conditions, it is absolutely necessary to have physics-based models that can accurately simulate the RF processes that affect the dynamical evolution of the ITER discharge. The Center for Simulation of WavePlasma Interactions (CSWPI), also known as RF-SciDAC, ismore » a multi-institutional collaboration that has conducted ongoing research aimed at developing: (1) Coupled core-to-edge simulations that will lead to an increased understanding of parasitic losses of the applied RF power in the boundary plasma between the RF antenna and the core plasma; (2) Development of models for core interactions of RF waves with energetic electrons and ions (including fusion alpha particles and fast neutral beam ions) that include a more accurate representation of the particle dynamics in the combined equilibrium and wave fields; and (3) Development of improved algorithms that will take advantage of massively parallel computing platforms at the petascale level and beyond to achieve the needed physics, resolution, and/or statistics to address these issues. CompX provides computer codes and analysis for the calculation of the electron and ion distributions in velocity-space and plasma radius which are necessary for reliable calculations of power deposition and toroidal current drive due to combined radiofrequency and neutral beam at high injected powers. It has also contributed to ray tracing modeling of injected radiofrequency powers, and to coupling between full-wave radiofrequency wave models and the distribution function calculations. In the course of this research, the Fokker-Planck distribution function calculation was made substantially more realistic by inclusion of finite-width drift-orbit effects (FOW). FOW effects were also implemented in a calculation of the phase-space diffusion resulting from radiofrequency full-wave models. Average level of funding for CompX was approximately three man-months per year.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]
  1. CompX, Del Mar, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
CompX, Del Mar, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) (SC-24)
OSTI Identifier:
1408768
Report Number(s):
DOE-COMPX-54649
DOE Contract Number:  
FC02-01ER54649
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS

Citation Formats

Harvey, R.W.. SCIDAC Center for simulation of wave particle interactions CompX participation. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1408768.
Harvey, R.W.. SCIDAC Center for simulation of wave particle interactions CompX participation. United States. doi:10.2172/1408768.
Harvey, R.W.. Tue . "SCIDAC Center for simulation of wave particle interactions CompX participation". United States. doi:10.2172/1408768. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1408768.
@article{osti_1408768,
title = {SCIDAC Center for simulation of wave particle interactions CompX participation},
author = {Harvey, R.W.},
abstractNote = {Harnessing the energy that is released in fusion reactions would provide a safe and abundant source of power to meet the growing energy needs of the world population. The next step toward the development of fusion as a practical energy source is the construction of ITER, a device capable of producing and controlling the high performance plasma required for self-sustaining fusion reactions, or “burning” plasma. The input power required to drive the ITER plasma into the burning regime will be supplied primarily with a combination of external power from radio frequency waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies and energetic ions from neutral beam injection sources, in addition to internally generated Ohmic heating from the induced plasma current that also serves to create the magnetic equilibrium for the discharge. The ITER project is a large multi-billion dollar international project in which the US participates. The success of the ITER project depends critically on the ability to create and maintain burning plasma conditions, it is absolutely necessary to have physics-based models that can accurately simulate the RF processes that affect the dynamical evolution of the ITER discharge. The Center for Simulation of WavePlasma Interactions (CSWPI), also known as RF-SciDAC, is a multi-institutional collaboration that has conducted ongoing research aimed at developing: (1) Coupled core-to-edge simulations that will lead to an increased understanding of parasitic losses of the applied RF power in the boundary plasma between the RF antenna and the core plasma; (2) Development of models for core interactions of RF waves with energetic electrons and ions (including fusion alpha particles and fast neutral beam ions) that include a more accurate representation of the particle dynamics in the combined equilibrium and wave fields; and (3) Development of improved algorithms that will take advantage of massively parallel computing platforms at the petascale level and beyond to achieve the needed physics, resolution, and/or statistics to address these issues. CompX provides computer codes and analysis for the calculation of the electron and ion distributions in velocity-space and plasma radius which are necessary for reliable calculations of power deposition and toroidal current drive due to combined radiofrequency and neutral beam at high injected powers. It has also contributed to ray tracing modeling of injected radiofrequency powers, and to coupling between full-wave radiofrequency wave models and the distribution function calculations. In the course of this research, the Fokker-Planck distribution function calculation was made substantially more realistic by inclusion of finite-width drift-orbit effects (FOW). FOW effects were also implemented in a calculation of the phase-space diffusion resulting from radiofrequency full-wave models. Average level of funding for CompX was approximately three man-months per year.},
doi = {10.2172/1408768},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Nov 14 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Tue Nov 14 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

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