skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Human age and skin physiology shape diversity and abundance of Archaea on skin

Abstract

The human skin microbiome acts as an important barrier protecting our body from pathogens and other environmental influences. Recent investigations have provided evidence that Archaea are a constant but highly variable component of the human skin microbiome, yet factors that determine their abundance changes are unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the abundance of archaea on human skin is influenced by human age and skin physiology by quantitative PCR of 51 different skin samples taken from human subjects of various age. Our results reveal that archaea are more abundant in human subjects either older than 60 years or younger than 12 years as compared to middle-aged human subjects. These results, together with results obtained from spectroscopy analysis, allowed us gain first insights into a potential link of lower sebum levels and lipid content and thus reduced skin moisture with an increase in archaeal signatures. In conclusion, amplicon sequencing of selected samples revealed the prevalence of specific eury- and mainly thaumarchaeal taxa, represented by a core archaeome of the human skin.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [3];  [4];  [1];  [5];  [6]
  1. Medical Univ. of Graz, Graz (Austria). Dept. of Internal Medicine; BioTechMed-Graz, Graz (Austria)
  2. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Earth and Planetary Science
  3. Elettra - Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale, Trieste (Italy); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Berkeley Synchrotron Infrared Structural Biology Program
  4. Univ. of Regensburg (Germany). Dept. of Microbiology and Archaea Center
  5. Medical Univ. of Graz, Graz (Austria). Dept. of Dermatology
  6. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Berkeley Synchrotron Infrared Structural Biology Program
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22); USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1408493
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Scientific Reports
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2045-2322
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; Archaea; Microbiome

Citation Formats

Moissl-Eichinger, Christine, Probst, Alexander J., Birarda, Giovanni, Auerbach, Anna, Koskinen, Kaisa, Wolf, Peter, and Holman, Hoi-Ying N. Human age and skin physiology shape diversity and abundance of Archaea on skin. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-04197-4.
Moissl-Eichinger, Christine, Probst, Alexander J., Birarda, Giovanni, Auerbach, Anna, Koskinen, Kaisa, Wolf, Peter, & Holman, Hoi-Ying N. Human age and skin physiology shape diversity and abundance of Archaea on skin. United States. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-04197-4.
Moissl-Eichinger, Christine, Probst, Alexander J., Birarda, Giovanni, Auerbach, Anna, Koskinen, Kaisa, Wolf, Peter, and Holman, Hoi-Ying N. 2017. "Human age and skin physiology shape diversity and abundance of Archaea on skin". United States. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-04197-4. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1408493.
@article{osti_1408493,
title = {Human age and skin physiology shape diversity and abundance of Archaea on skin},
author = {Moissl-Eichinger, Christine and Probst, Alexander J. and Birarda, Giovanni and Auerbach, Anna and Koskinen, Kaisa and Wolf, Peter and Holman, Hoi-Ying N.},
abstractNote = {The human skin microbiome acts as an important barrier protecting our body from pathogens and other environmental influences. Recent investigations have provided evidence that Archaea are a constant but highly variable component of the human skin microbiome, yet factors that determine their abundance changes are unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the abundance of archaea on human skin is influenced by human age and skin physiology by quantitative PCR of 51 different skin samples taken from human subjects of various age. Our results reveal that archaea are more abundant in human subjects either older than 60 years or younger than 12 years as compared to middle-aged human subjects. These results, together with results obtained from spectroscopy analysis, allowed us gain first insights into a potential link of lower sebum levels and lipid content and thus reduced skin moisture with an increase in archaeal signatures. In conclusion, amplicon sequencing of selected samples revealed the prevalence of specific eury- and mainly thaumarchaeal taxa, represented by a core archaeome of the human skin.},
doi = {10.1038/s41598-017-04197-4},
journal = {Scientific Reports},
number = 1,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 6
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Save / Share:
  • The impact of heavy-metal contamination on archaean communities was studied in soils amended with sewage sludge contaminated with heavy metals to varying extents. Fluorescent in situ hybridization showed a decrease in the percentage of Archaea from 1.3% {+-} 0.3% of 4{prime},6-diamidino-2-phenylindole-stained cells in untreated soil to below the detection limit in soils amended with heavy metals. A comparison of the archaean communities of the different plots by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis revealed differences in the structure of the archaean communities in soils with increasing heavy-metal contamination. Analysis of cloned 16S ribosomal DNA showed close similarities to a unique and globallymore » distributed lineage of the kingdom Chrenarchaeota that is phylogenetically distinct from currently characterized crenarchaeotal species.« less
  • No abstract prepared.
  • The class Tremellomycete (Agaricomycotina) encompasses more than 380 fungi. Although there are a few edible Tremella spp., the only species with current biotechnological use is the astaxanthin-producing yeast Phaffia rhodozyma (Cystofilobasidiales). Besides astaxanthin, a carotenoid pigment with potent antioxidant activity and great value for aquaculture and pharmaceutical industries, P. rhodozyma possesses multiple exceptional traits of fundamental and applied interest. The aim of this study was to obtain, and analyze two new genome sequences of representative strains from the northern (CBS 7918 T, the type strain) and southern hemispheres (CRUB 1149) and compre them to a previously published genome sequence (strainmore » CBS 6938). Furthermore, photoprotection and antioxidant related genes, as well as genes involved in sexual reproduction were analyzed.« less
  • Soda lakes are salt lakes with a naturally alkaline pH due to evaporative concentration of sodium carbonates in the absence of major divalent cations. Hypersaline soda brines harbor microbial communities with a high species- and strain-level archaeal diversity and a large proportion of still uncultured poly-extremophiles compared to neutral brines of similar salinities. We present the first "metagenomic snapshots" of microbial communities thriving in the brines of four shallow soda lakes from the Kulunda Steppe (Altai, Russia) covering a salinity range from 170 to 400 g/L. Both amplicon sequencing of 16S rRNA fragments and direct metagenomic sequencing showed that themore » top-level taxa abundance was linked to the ambient salinity: Bacteroidetes, Alpha-, and Gamma-proteobacteria were dominant below a salinity of 250 g/L, Euryarchaeota at higher salinities. Within these taxa, amplicon sequences related to Halorubrum, Natrinema, Gracilimonas, purple non-sulfur bacteria (Rhizobiales, Rhodobacter, and Rhodobaca) and chemolithotrophic sulfur oxidizers (Thioalkalivibrio) were highly abundant. Twenty-four draft population genomes from novel members and ecotypes within the Nanohaloarchaea, Halobacteria, and Bacteroidetes were reconstructed to explore their metabolic features, environmental abundance and strategies for osmotic adaptation. The Halobacteria- and Bacteroidetes-related draft genomes belong to putative aerobic heterotrophs, likely with the capacity to ferment sugars in the absence of oxygen. Members from both taxonomic groups are likely involved in primary organic carbon degradation, since some of the reconstructed genomes encode the ability to hydrolyze recalcitrant substrates, such as cellulose and chitin. Putative sodium-pumping rhodopsins were found in both a Flavobacteriaceae- and a Chitinophagaceae-related draft genome. The predicted proteomes of both the latter and a Rhodothermace ae-related draft genome were indicative of a "salt-in" strategy of osmotic adaptation. The primary catabolic and respiratory pathways shared among all available reference genomes of Nanohaloarchaea and our novel genome reconstructions remain incomplete, but point to a primarily fermentative lifestyle. Encoded xenorhodopsins found in most drafts suggest that light plays an important role in the ecology of Nanohaloarchaea. Putative encoded halolysins and laccase-like oxidases might indicate the potential for extracellular degradation of proteins and peptides, and phenolic or aromatic compounds.« less