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Title: Engineering the lutein epoxide cycle into Arabidopsis thaliana

Abstract

Although sunlight provides the energy necessary for plants to survive and grow, light can also damage reaction centers of photosystem II (PSII) and reduce photochemical efficiency. To prevent damage, plants possess photoprotective mechanisms that dissipate excess excitation. A subset of these mechanisms is collectively referred to as NPQ, or nonphotochemical quenching of chlorophyll a fluorescence. The regulation of NPQ is intrinsically linked to the cycling of xanthophylls that affects the kinetics and extent of the photoprotective response. The violaxanthin cycle (VAZ cycle) and the lutein epoxide cycle (LxL cycle) are two xanthophyll cycles found in vascular plants. The VAZ cycle has been studied extensively, owing in large part to its presence in model plant species where mutants are available to aid in its characterization. In contrast, the LxL cycle is not found in model plants, and its role in photosynthetic processes has been more difficult to define. To address this challenge, we introduced the LxL cycle into Arabidopsis thaliana and functionally isolated it from the VAZ cycle. Using these plant lines, we showed an increase in dark-acclimated PSII efficiency associated with Lx accumulation and demonstrated that violaxanthin deepoxidase is responsible for the light-driven deepoxidation of Lx. Conversion of Lx tomore » L was reversible during periods of low light and occurred considerably faster than rates previously described in nonmodel species. Finally, we present clear evidence of the LxL cycle’s role in modulating a rapid component of NPQ that is necessary to prevent photoinhibition in excess light.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Howard Hughes Medical Inst., Dept. of Plant and Microbial Biology
  2. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Howard Hughes Medical Inst., Dept. of Plant and Microbial Biology; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular and Integrated Bioimaging Division
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1408465
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 114; Journal Issue: 33; Journal ID: ISSN 0027-8424
Publisher:
National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC (United States)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; lutein; lutein epoxide; nonphotochemical quenching; photoprotection; xanthophyll cycle

Citation Formats

Leonelli, Lauriebeth, Brooks, Matthew D., and Niyogi, Krishna K. Engineering the lutein epoxide cycle into Arabidopsis thaliana. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1073/pnas.1704373114.
Leonelli, Lauriebeth, Brooks, Matthew D., & Niyogi, Krishna K. Engineering the lutein epoxide cycle into Arabidopsis thaliana. United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.1704373114.
Leonelli, Lauriebeth, Brooks, Matthew D., and Niyogi, Krishna K. 2017. "Engineering the lutein epoxide cycle into Arabidopsis thaliana". United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.1704373114. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1408465.
@article{osti_1408465,
title = {Engineering the lutein epoxide cycle into Arabidopsis thaliana},
author = {Leonelli, Lauriebeth and Brooks, Matthew D. and Niyogi, Krishna K.},
abstractNote = {Although sunlight provides the energy necessary for plants to survive and grow, light can also damage reaction centers of photosystem II (PSII) and reduce photochemical efficiency. To prevent damage, plants possess photoprotective mechanisms that dissipate excess excitation. A subset of these mechanisms is collectively referred to as NPQ, or nonphotochemical quenching of chlorophyll a fluorescence. The regulation of NPQ is intrinsically linked to the cycling of xanthophylls that affects the kinetics and extent of the photoprotective response. The violaxanthin cycle (VAZ cycle) and the lutein epoxide cycle (LxL cycle) are two xanthophyll cycles found in vascular plants. The VAZ cycle has been studied extensively, owing in large part to its presence in model plant species where mutants are available to aid in its characterization. In contrast, the LxL cycle is not found in model plants, and its role in photosynthetic processes has been more difficult to define. To address this challenge, we introduced the LxL cycle into Arabidopsis thaliana and functionally isolated it from the VAZ cycle. Using these plant lines, we showed an increase in dark-acclimated PSII efficiency associated with Lx accumulation and demonstrated that violaxanthin deepoxidase is responsible for the light-driven deepoxidation of Lx. Conversion of Lx to L was reversible during periods of low light and occurred considerably faster than rates previously described in nonmodel species. Finally, we present clear evidence of the LxL cycle’s role in modulating a rapid component of NPQ that is necessary to prevent photoinhibition in excess light.},
doi = {10.1073/pnas.1704373114},
journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
number = 33,
volume = 114,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 7
}

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  • Although sunlight provides the energy necessary for plants to survive and grow, light can also damage reaction centers of photosystem II (PSII) and reduce photochemical efficiency. To prevent damage, plants possess photoprotective mechanisms that dissipate excess excitation. A subset of these mechanisms is collectively referred to as NPQ, or nonphotochemical quenching of chlorophyll a fluorescence. The regulation of NPQ is intrinsically linked to the cycling of xanthophylls that affects the kinetics and extent of the photoprotective response. The violaxanthin cycle (VAZ cycle) and the lutein epoxide cycle (LxL cycle) are two xanthophyll cycles found in vascular plants. The VAZ cyclemore » has been studied extensively, owing in large part to its presence in model plant species where mutants are available to aid in its characterization. In contrast, the LxL cycle is not found in model plants, and its role in photosynthetic processes has been more difficult to define. To address this challenge, we introduced the LxL cycle into Arabidopsis thaliana and functionally isolated it from the VAZ cycle. Using these plant lines, we showed an increase in dark-acclimated PSII efficiency associated with Lx accumulation and demonstrated that violaxanthin deepoxidase is responsible for the light-driven deepoxidation of Lx. Conversion of Lx to L was reversible during periods of low light and occurred considerably faster than rates previously described in nonmodel species. Finally, we present clear evidence of the LxL cycle’s role in modulating a rapid component of NPQ that is necessary to prevent photoinhibition in excess light.« less
    Cited by 1
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  • Amylase activity is elevated 5- to 10-fold in leaves of several different Arabidopsis thaliana mutants defective in starch metabolism when they are grown under a 12-hour photoperiod. Activity is also increased when plants are grown under higher light intensity. It was previously determined that the elevated activity was an extrachloroplastic {beta}-(exo)amylase. Due to the location of this enzyme outside the chloroplast, its function is not known. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity from leaves of both a starchless mutant deficient in plastid phosphoglucomutase and from the wild type using polyethylene glycol fractionation and cyclohexaamylose affinity chromatography. The molecular mass ofmore » the {beta}-amylase from both sources was 55,000 daltons as determined by denaturing gel electrophoresis. Gel filtration studies indicated that the enzyme was a monomer. The specific activities of the purified protein from mutant and wild-type sources, their substrate specificities, and K{sub m} for amylopectin were identical. Based on these results it was concluded that the mutant contained an increased level of {beta}-amylase protein. Enzyme neutralization studies using a polyclonal antiserum raised to purified {beta}-amylase showed that in each of two starchless mutants, one starch deficient mutant and one starch overproducing mutant, the elevated amylase activity was due to elevated {beta}-amylase protein.« less