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Title: Decision Support Algorithm for Evaluating Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Electricity Generation in the United States: Electricity Emissions Decision Support Algorithm

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. School for Environment and Sustainability, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor MI USA, Department of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor MI USA
  2. School for Environment and Sustainability, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor MI USA
  3. School for Environment and Sustainability, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor MI USA, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor MI USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1408270
Grant/Contract Number:
PI0000012
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Industrial Ecology
Additional Journal Information:
Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-11-10 11:59:14; Journal ID: ISSN 1088-1980
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Ryan, Nicole A., Johnson, Jeremiah X., Keoleian, Gregory A., and Lewis, Geoffrey M.. Decision Support Algorithm for Evaluating Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Electricity Generation in the United States: Electricity Emissions Decision Support Algorithm. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1111/jiec.12708.
Ryan, Nicole A., Johnson, Jeremiah X., Keoleian, Gregory A., & Lewis, Geoffrey M.. Decision Support Algorithm for Evaluating Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Electricity Generation in the United States: Electricity Emissions Decision Support Algorithm. United States. doi:10.1111/jiec.12708.
Ryan, Nicole A., Johnson, Jeremiah X., Keoleian, Gregory A., and Lewis, Geoffrey M.. 2017. "Decision Support Algorithm for Evaluating Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Electricity Generation in the United States: Electricity Emissions Decision Support Algorithm". United States. doi:10.1111/jiec.12708.
@article{osti_1408270,
title = {Decision Support Algorithm for Evaluating Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Electricity Generation in the United States: Electricity Emissions Decision Support Algorithm},
author = {Ryan, Nicole A. and Johnson, Jeremiah X. and Keoleian, Gregory A. and Lewis, Geoffrey M.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1111/jiec.12708},
journal = {Journal of Industrial Ecology},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on November 10, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

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