skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Modeling the temporal dynamics of nonstructural carbohydrate pools in forest trees

Abstract

Trees store carbohydrates, in the form of sugars and starch, as reserves to be used to power both future growth as well as to support day-to-day metabolic functions. These reserves are particularly important in the context of how trees cope with disturbance and stress—for example, as related to pest outbreaks, wind or ice damage, and extreme climate events. In this project, we measured the size of carbon reserves in forest trees, and determined how quickly these reserves are used and replaced—i.e., their “turnover time”. Our work was conducted at Harvard Forest, a temperate deciduous forest in central Massachusetts. Through field sampling, laboratory-based chemical analyses, and allometric modeling, we scaled these measurements up to whole-tree NSC budgets. We used these data to test and improve computer simulation models of carbon flow through forest ecosystems. Our modeling focused on the mathematical representation of these stored carbon reserves, and we examined the sensitivity of model performance to different model structures. This project contributes to DOE’s goal to improve next-generation models of the earth system, and to understand the impacts of climate change on terrestrial ecosystems.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1408104
Report Number(s):
DOE-HARV-2416
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0012416
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; Harvard Forest; Carbon allocation; Ecosystem modeling; Nonstructural carbon; Radiocarbon; Carbon budget

Citation Formats

Richardson, Andrew D. Modeling the temporal dynamics of nonstructural carbohydrate pools in forest trees. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1408104.
Richardson, Andrew D. Modeling the temporal dynamics of nonstructural carbohydrate pools in forest trees. United States. doi:10.2172/1408104.
Richardson, Andrew D. Thu . "Modeling the temporal dynamics of nonstructural carbohydrate pools in forest trees". United States. doi:10.2172/1408104. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1408104.
@article{osti_1408104,
title = {Modeling the temporal dynamics of nonstructural carbohydrate pools in forest trees},
author = {Richardson, Andrew D.},
abstractNote = {Trees store carbohydrates, in the form of sugars and starch, as reserves to be used to power both future growth as well as to support day-to-day metabolic functions. These reserves are particularly important in the context of how trees cope with disturbance and stress—for example, as related to pest outbreaks, wind or ice damage, and extreme climate events. In this project, we measured the size of carbon reserves in forest trees, and determined how quickly these reserves are used and replaced—i.e., their “turnover time”. Our work was conducted at Harvard Forest, a temperate deciduous forest in central Massachusetts. Through field sampling, laboratory-based chemical analyses, and allometric modeling, we scaled these measurements up to whole-tree NSC budgets. We used these data to test and improve computer simulation models of carbon flow through forest ecosystems. Our modeling focused on the mathematical representation of these stored carbon reserves, and we examined the sensitivity of model performance to different model structures. This project contributes to DOE’s goal to improve next-generation models of the earth system, and to understand the impacts of climate change on terrestrial ecosystems.},
doi = {10.2172/1408104},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Nov 09 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Thu Nov 09 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share: