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Title: Thermal fractionation of biomass of non-lignocellulosic origin for multiple high-quality biofuels

Abstract

Methods for production of multiple biofuels through thermal fractionation of biomass feedstocks are described. The products of said methods are also described.

Inventors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1407950
Patent Number(s):
9,809,781
Application Number:
14/589,405
Assignee:
The University of Toledo DOEEE
DOE Contract Number:
EEO005993
Resource Type:
Patent
Resource Relation:
Patent File Date: 2015 Jan 05
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS

Citation Formats

Maddi, Balakrishna, Viamajala, Sridhar, and Varanasi, Sasidhar. Thermal fractionation of biomass of non-lignocellulosic origin for multiple high-quality biofuels. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Maddi, Balakrishna, Viamajala, Sridhar, & Varanasi, Sasidhar. Thermal fractionation of biomass of non-lignocellulosic origin for multiple high-quality biofuels. United States.
Maddi, Balakrishna, Viamajala, Sridhar, and Varanasi, Sasidhar. 2017. "Thermal fractionation of biomass of non-lignocellulosic origin for multiple high-quality biofuels". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1407950.
@article{osti_1407950,
title = {Thermal fractionation of biomass of non-lignocellulosic origin for multiple high-quality biofuels},
author = {Maddi, Balakrishna and Viamajala, Sridhar and Varanasi, Sasidhar},
abstractNote = {Methods for production of multiple biofuels through thermal fractionation of biomass feedstocks are described. The products of said methods are also described.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Patent:

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  • A multi-function process is described for the hydrolysis and fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass to separate hemicellulosic sugars from other biomass components such as extractives and proteins; a portion of the solubilized lignin; cellulose; glucose derived from cellulose; and insoluble lignin from said biomass comprising one or more of the following: optionally, as function 1, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0--5.0 into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing a lignocellulosic biomass material at a temperature of about 94 to about 160 C for a period of about 10 to about 120 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of about 1more » to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of extractives, lignin, and protein by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; as function 2, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0--5.0, either as virgin acid or an acidic stream from another function, into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing either fresh biomass or the partially fractionated lignocellulosic biomass material from function 1 at a temperature of about 94--220 C for a period of about 10 to about 60 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of about 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of hemicellulosic sugars, semisoluble sugars and other compounds, and amorphous glucans by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; as function 3, optionally, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0--5.0 either as virgin acid or an acidic stream from another function, into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing the partially fractionated lignocellulosic biomass material from function 2 at a temperature of about 180--280 C for a period of about 10 to about 60 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of cellulosic sugars by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; and as function 4, optionally, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0--5.0 either as virgin acid or an acidic stream from another function, into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing the partially fractionated lignocellulosic biomass material from function 3 at a temperature of about 180--280 C for a period of about 10 to about 60 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of about 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of cellulosic sugars by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process.« less
  • A multi-function process is described for the hydrolysis and fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass to separate hemicellulosic sugars from other biomass components such as extractives and proteins; a portion of the solubilized lignin; cellulose; glucose derived from cellulose; and insoluble lignin from said biomass comprising one or more of the following: optionally, as function 1, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0 into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing a lignocellulosic biomass material at a temperature of about 94 to about 160.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 120 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of about 1more » to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of extractives, lignin, and protein by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; as function 2, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0, either as virgin acid or an acidic stream from another function, into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing either fresh biomass or the partially fractionated lignocellulosic biomass material from function 1 at a temperature of about 94-220.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 60 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of about 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of hemicellulosic sugars, semisoluble sugars and other compounds, and amorphous glucans by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; as function 3, optionally, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0 either as virgin acid or an acidic stream from another function, into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing the partially fractionated lignocellulosic biomass material from function 2 at a temperature of about 180-280.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 60 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of cellulosic sugars by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; and as function 4, optionally, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0 either as virgin acid or an acidic stream from another function, into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing the partially fractionated lignocellulosic biomass material from function 3 at a temperature of about 180-280.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 60 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of about 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of cellulosic sugars by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process.« less
  • A true biorefinery for processing lignocellulosic biomass should achieve maximum utilization of all major constituents (cellulose, hemicellulose, & lignin) within the feedstock. In this work a combined pretreatment process of dilute acid (DA) and N-methyl morpholine N-oxide (NMMO) is described that allows for both fractionation and subsequent complete hydrolysis of the feedstocks (corn stover and sugarcane bagasse). During this multi-step processing, the dilute acid pretreatment solubilizes the majority (>90%) of the hemicellulosic fraction, while the NMMO treatment yields a cellulosic fraction that is completely digestible within 48 hours at low enzyme loadings. With both the cellulosic and hemicellulosic fractions beingmore » converted into separate, dissolved sugar fractions, the remaining portion is nearly pure lignin. When used independently, DA and NMMO pretreatments are only able to achieve ~80% and ~45% cellulosic conversion, respectively. Mass balance calculations along with experimental results are used to illustrate the feasibility of separation and recycling of NMMO.« less
  • A bio-oil production process involving torrefaction pretreatment, catalytic esterification, pyrolysis, and secondary catalytic processing significantly reduces yields of reactor char, catalyst coke, and catalyst tar relative to the best-case conditions using non-torrefied feedstock. The reduction in coke as a result of torrefaction was 28.5% relative to the respective control for slow pyrolysis bio-oil upgrading. In fast pyrolysis bio-oil processing, the greatest reduction in coke was 34.9%. Torrefaction at 275.degree. C. reduced levels of acid products including acetic acid and formic acid in the bio-oil, which reduced catalyst coking and increased catalyst effectiveness and aromatic hydrocarbon yields in the upgraded oils.more » The process of bio-oil generation further comprises a catalytic esterification of acids and aldehydes to generate such as ethyl levulinate from lignified biomass feedstock.« less
  • A method is provided for fractionation of oil obtained by pyrolysis of lignocellulosic materials to obtain useful chemical fractions, including a phenolic fraction which is suitable as a total or partial replacement for phenol in making phenolformaldehyde resins. The method comprises mixing the oil with a strong base such as sodium hydroxide to a ph level at which the neutral fraction of the oil is selectively soluble in a solvent such as methylene chloride or ether, and the mixture is extracted with the solvent to obtain a first extract containing the solvent and the neutral fraction, and a first raffinatemore » containing the remaining fractions of the oil, I.E., the phenolic fraction, the organic acids fraction and an amorphous residue. The neutral fraction is recovered by distillation and the first raffinate is mixed with sulfuric acid to lower its ph to a level at which the phenolic fraction is selectively soluble in the solvent. This raffinate is extracted with the solvent to obtain a second extract containing the solvent and the phenolic fraction and a second raffinate containing the organic acids and the residues. The phenolic fraction is recovered by distillation and the second raffinate is mixed with sulfuric acid to lower its ph to a level at which the organic acids are selectively soluble in the solvent. After separation of the residues, the second raffinate is extracted with the solvent to obtain a third extract which is distilled to recover the organic acids fraction of the oil. The phenolic fraction may be used as partial or total replacement for pure phenol in making phenol-formaldehyde resins.« less