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Title: Laser Additive Manufacturing of F/M Steels for Radiation Tolerant Nuclear Components

Abstract

According to the Nuclear Energy R&D Roadmap Report submitted to Congress in 2010, one the key challenges facing the nuclear energy industry involves development of new reactor designs with reduced capital costs. Two related R&D objectives outlined in the report include: 1) Making improvements in the affordability of new reactors; and 2) Development of structural materials to withstand irradiation for longer periods. Laser additive manufacturing (LAM) is particularly well suited for more rapid and economical fabrication of reactor components relative to current fabrication methods. The proposed work involving LAM directly addresses the two R&D objectives outlined above relevant to the pertinent mission problems. The classical Materials Science approach involving development of Process/Structure/Property/Performance (P/S/P/P) relations was employed in this project. Processing included LAM and heat-treating. Thermal cycling during LAM is discussed here, and phase diagrams and continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagrams are used to rationalize microstructural evolution. Structures were characterized including grain size & morphology, volume fraction, morphology, composition and location of carbides in as-deposited and heat-treated conditions. In the simplest sense, the goal was to control microstructures through process manipulation with a view toward optimizing properties and performance in service.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1407859
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-30052
DOE Contract Number:  
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS; additive manufacturing; Grade 91 steel

Citation Formats

Lienert, Thomas J., and Maloy, Stuart Andrew. Laser Additive Manufacturing of F/M Steels for Radiation Tolerant Nuclear Components. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1407859.
Lienert, Thomas J., & Maloy, Stuart Andrew. Laser Additive Manufacturing of F/M Steels for Radiation Tolerant Nuclear Components. United States. doi:10.2172/1407859.
Lienert, Thomas J., and Maloy, Stuart Andrew. Thu . "Laser Additive Manufacturing of F/M Steels for Radiation Tolerant Nuclear Components". United States. doi:10.2172/1407859. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1407859.
@article{osti_1407859,
title = {Laser Additive Manufacturing of F/M Steels for Radiation Tolerant Nuclear Components},
author = {Lienert, Thomas J. and Maloy, Stuart Andrew},
abstractNote = {According to the Nuclear Energy R&D Roadmap Report submitted to Congress in 2010, one the key challenges facing the nuclear energy industry involves development of new reactor designs with reduced capital costs. Two related R&D objectives outlined in the report include: 1) Making improvements in the affordability of new reactors; and 2) Development of structural materials to withstand irradiation for longer periods. Laser additive manufacturing (LAM) is particularly well suited for more rapid and economical fabrication of reactor components relative to current fabrication methods. The proposed work involving LAM directly addresses the two R&D objectives outlined above relevant to the pertinent mission problems. The classical Materials Science approach involving development of Process/Structure/Property/Performance (P/S/P/P) relations was employed in this project. Processing included LAM and heat-treating. Thermal cycling during LAM is discussed here, and phase diagrams and continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagrams are used to rationalize microstructural evolution. Structures were characterized including grain size & morphology, volume fraction, morphology, composition and location of carbides in as-deposited and heat-treated conditions. In the simplest sense, the goal was to control microstructures through process manipulation with a view toward optimizing properties and performance in service.},
doi = {10.2172/1407859},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {11}
}

Technical Report:

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