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Title: High-temperature charge density wave correlations in La 1.875Ba 0.125CuO 4 without spin–charge locking

Abstract

Although all superconducting cuprates display charge-ordering tendencies, their low-temperature properties are distinct, impeding efforts to understand the phenomena within a single conceptual framework. While some systems exhibit stripes of charge and spin, with a locked periodicity, others host charge density waves (CDWs) without any obviously related spin order. Here we use resonant inelastic X-ray scattering to follow the evolution of charge correlations in the canonical stripe-ordered cuprate La 1.875Ba 0.125CuO 4 across its ordering transition. We find that high-temperature charge correlations are unlocked from the wavevector of the spin correlations, signaling analogies to CDW phases in various other cuprates. This indicates that stripe order at low temperatures is stabilized by the coupling of otherwise independent charge and spin density waves, with important implications for the relation between charge and spin correlations in the cuprates.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [5];  [5];  [5];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [4];  [4]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Dept.
  2. Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Roma (Italy). Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Dept.; Sapienza Univ. of Rome (Italy). Dipartimento di Fisica
  3. Brandenburg Univ. of Technology (BTU), Cottbus-Senftenberg (Germany)
  4. Politecnico di Milano (Italy). Dipartimento di Fisica; National Research Council (CNR), Milano (Italy). Inst. for Superconductors, Innovative Materials and Devices (CNR-SPIN)
  5. European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), Grenoble (France)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1407841
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1412667
Report Number(s):
BNL-114456-2017-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 0027-8424; R&D Project: PM015; KC0207010; KC0202030
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0012704
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 114; Journal Issue: 47; Journal ID: ISSN 0027-8424
Publisher:
National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC (United States)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; Charge density waves; Stripes; Superconductivity; Cuprates

Citation Formats

Miao, H., Lorenzana, J., Seibold, G., Peng, Y. Y., Amorese, A., Yakhou-Harris, F., Kummer, K., Brookes, N. B., Konik, R. M., Thampy, V., Gu, G. D., Ghiringhelli, G., Braicovich, L., and Dean, M. P. M. High-temperature charge density wave correlations in La1.875Ba0.125CuO4 without spin–charge locking. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1073/pnas.1708549114.
Miao, H., Lorenzana, J., Seibold, G., Peng, Y. Y., Amorese, A., Yakhou-Harris, F., Kummer, K., Brookes, N. B., Konik, R. M., Thampy, V., Gu, G. D., Ghiringhelli, G., Braicovich, L., & Dean, M. P. M. High-temperature charge density wave correlations in La1.875Ba0.125CuO4 without spin–charge locking. United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.1708549114.
Miao, H., Lorenzana, J., Seibold, G., Peng, Y. Y., Amorese, A., Yakhou-Harris, F., Kummer, K., Brookes, N. B., Konik, R. M., Thampy, V., Gu, G. D., Ghiringhelli, G., Braicovich, L., and Dean, M. P. M. Tue . "High-temperature charge density wave correlations in La1.875Ba0.125CuO4 without spin–charge locking". United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.1708549114.
@article{osti_1407841,
title = {High-temperature charge density wave correlations in La1.875Ba0.125CuO4 without spin–charge locking},
author = {Miao, H. and Lorenzana, J. and Seibold, G. and Peng, Y. Y. and Amorese, A. and Yakhou-Harris, F. and Kummer, K. and Brookes, N. B. and Konik, R. M. and Thampy, V. and Gu, G. D. and Ghiringhelli, G. and Braicovich, L. and Dean, M. P. M.},
abstractNote = {Although all superconducting cuprates display charge-ordering tendencies, their low-temperature properties are distinct, impeding efforts to understand the phenomena within a single conceptual framework. While some systems exhibit stripes of charge and spin, with a locked periodicity, others host charge density waves (CDWs) without any obviously related spin order. Here we use resonant inelastic X-ray scattering to follow the evolution of charge correlations in the canonical stripe-ordered cuprate La1.875Ba0.125CuO4 across its ordering transition. We find that high-temperature charge correlations are unlocked from the wavevector of the spin correlations, signaling analogies to CDW phases in various other cuprates. This indicates that stripe order at low temperatures is stabilized by the coupling of otherwise independent charge and spin density waves, with important implications for the relation between charge and spin correlations in the cuprates.},
doi = {10.1073/pnas.1708549114},
journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
number = 47,
volume = 114,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Nov 07 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Tue Nov 07 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1073/pnas.1708549114

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 3works
Citation information provided by
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  • Although all superconducting cuprates display charge-ordering tendencies, their low-temperature properties are distinct, impeding efforts to understand the phenomena within a single conceptual framework. While some systems exhibit stripes of charge and spin, with a locked periodicity, others host charge density waves (CDWs) without any obviously related spin order. Here we use resonant inelastic X-ray scattering to follow the evolution of charge correlations in the canonical stripe-ordered cuprate La 1.875Ba 0.125CuO 4 across its ordering transition. We find that high-temperature charge correlations are unlocked from the wavevector of the spin correlations, signaling analogies to CDW phases in various other cuprates. Thismore » indicates that stripe order at low temperatures is stabilized by the coupling of otherwise independent charge and spin density waves, with important implications for the relation between charge and spin correlations in the cuprates.« less
    Cited by 3
  • Recent theories of charge density wave (CDW) order in high temperature superconductors have predicted a primarily d CDW orbital symmetry. Here, we report on the orbital symmetry of CDW order in the canonical cuprate superconductors La 1.875Ba 0.125CuO 4 (LBCO) and YBa 2Cu 3O 6.67 (YBCO), using resonant soft x-ray scattering and a model mapped to the CDW orbital symmetry. From measurements sensitive to the O sublattice, we conclude that LBCO has predominantly s0 CDW orbital symmetry, in contrast to the d orbital symmetry recently reported in other cuprates. Additionally, we show for YBCO that the CDW orbital symmetry differsmore » along the a and b crystal axes and that these both differ from LBCO. This work highlights CDW orbital symmetry as an additional key property that distinguishes the di erent cuprate families.« less
  • The occurrence of charge-density-wave (CDW) order in underdoped cuprates is now well established, although the precise nature of the CDW and its relationship with superconductivity is not. Theoretical proposals include contrasting ideas such as that pairing may be driven by CDW uctuations or that static CDWs may intertwine with a spatially-modulated superconducting wave function. We test the dynamics of CDW order in La 1.875Ba 0.125CuO 4 by using x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) at the CDW wave vector, detected resonantly at the Cu L 3-edge. We nd that the CDW domains are strikingly static, with no evidence of signi cantmore » uctuations up to 2 3/4 hours. We discuss the implications of these results for some of the competing theories.« less