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Title: Carbon balance of CO2-EOR for NCNO classification

Abstract

The question of whether carbon dioxide enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR) constitutes a valid alternative for greenhouse gas emission reduction has been frequently asked by the general public and environmental sectors. Through this technology, operational since 1972, oil production is enhanced by injecting CO2 into depleted oil reservoirs in order displace the residual oil toward production wells in a solvent/miscible process. For decades, the CO2 utilized for EOR has been most commonly sourced from natural CO2 accumulations. More recently, a few projects have emerged where anthropogenic CO2 (A-CO2) is captured at an industrial facility, transported to a depleted oil field, and utilized for EOR. If carbon geologic storage is one of the project objectives, all the CO2 injected into the oil field for EOR could technically be stored in the formation. Even though the CO2 is being prevented from entering the atmosphere, and permanently stored away in a secured geologic formation, a question arises as to whether the total CO2 volumes stored in order to produce the incremental oil through EOR are larger than the CO2 emitted throughout the entire CO2-EOR process, including the capture facility, the EOR site, and the refining and burning of the end product. We intend tomore » answer some of these questions through a DOE-NETL funded study titled “Carbon Life Cycle Analysis of CO2-EOR for Net Carbon Negative Oil (NCNO) Classification”. NCNO is defined as oil whose carbon emissions to the atmosphere, when burned or otherwise used, are less than the amount of carbon permanently stored in the reservoir in order to produce the oil. In this paper, we focus on the EOR site in what is referred to as a gate-to-gate system, but are inclusive of the burning of the refined product, as this end member is explicitly stated in the definition of NCNO. Finally, we use Cranfield, Mississippi, as a case study and come to the conclusion that the incremental oil produced is net carbon negative.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ; ;
  1. The University of Texas at Austin
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
The University of Texas at Austin
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
1407713
Report Number(s):
DOE-UTBEG-4433-1
DOE Contract Number:  
FE0024433
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Energy Procedia; Conference: 13th International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies, GHGT-13, 14-18 November 2016, Lausanne, Switzerland
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CO2 EOR, NCNO, Carbon Balance, CCS

Citation Formats

Nunez-Lopez, Vanessa, Gil-Egui, Ramon, Gonzalez-Nicolas, Ana, and Hovorka, Susan D. Carbon balance of CO2-EOR for NCNO classification. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Nunez-Lopez, Vanessa, Gil-Egui, Ramon, Gonzalez-Nicolas, Ana, & Hovorka, Susan D. Carbon balance of CO2-EOR for NCNO classification. United States.
Nunez-Lopez, Vanessa, Gil-Egui, Ramon, Gonzalez-Nicolas, Ana, and Hovorka, Susan D. Sat . "Carbon balance of CO2-EOR for NCNO classification". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1407713.
@article{osti_1407713,
title = {Carbon balance of CO2-EOR for NCNO classification},
author = {Nunez-Lopez, Vanessa and Gil-Egui, Ramon and Gonzalez-Nicolas, Ana and Hovorka, Susan D},
abstractNote = {The question of whether carbon dioxide enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR) constitutes a valid alternative for greenhouse gas emission reduction has been frequently asked by the general public and environmental sectors. Through this technology, operational since 1972, oil production is enhanced by injecting CO2 into depleted oil reservoirs in order displace the residual oil toward production wells in a solvent/miscible process. For decades, the CO2 utilized for EOR has been most commonly sourced from natural CO2 accumulations. More recently, a few projects have emerged where anthropogenic CO2 (A-CO2) is captured at an industrial facility, transported to a depleted oil field, and utilized for EOR. If carbon geologic storage is one of the project objectives, all the CO2 injected into the oil field for EOR could technically be stored in the formation. Even though the CO2 is being prevented from entering the atmosphere, and permanently stored away in a secured geologic formation, a question arises as to whether the total CO2 volumes stored in order to produce the incremental oil through EOR are larger than the CO2 emitted throughout the entire CO2-EOR process, including the capture facility, the EOR site, and the refining and burning of the end product. We intend to answer some of these questions through a DOE-NETL funded study titled “Carbon Life Cycle Analysis of CO2-EOR for Net Carbon Negative Oil (NCNO) Classification”. NCNO is defined as oil whose carbon emissions to the atmosphere, when burned or otherwise used, are less than the amount of carbon permanently stored in the reservoir in order to produce the oil. In this paper, we focus on the EOR site in what is referred to as a gate-to-gate system, but are inclusive of the burning of the refined product, as this end member is explicitly stated in the definition of NCNO. Finally, we use Cranfield, Mississippi, as a case study and come to the conclusion that the incremental oil produced is net carbon negative.},
doi = {},
journal = {Energy Procedia},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Mar 18 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Mar 18 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Conference:
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