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Title: Aqueous Rare Earth Element Patterns and Concentration in Thermal Brines Associated With Oil and Gas Production

Abstract

This study is part of a joint effort by the University of Wyoming (UW) School of Energy Resources (SER), the UW Engineering Department, Idaho National Laboratories (INL), and the United States Geological Survey (USGS) to describe rare earth element concentrations in oil and gas produced waters and in coal-fired power station ash ponds. In this work we present rare earth element (REE) and trace metal behavior in produced water from four Wyoming oil and gas fields and surface ash pond water from two coal-fired power stations. The concentration of REEs in oil and gas produced waters is largely unknown. For example, of the 150,000 entries in the USGS National Produced Waters Geochemical Database less than 5 include data for REEs. Part of the reason for this scarcity is the analytical challenge of measuring REEs in high salinity, hydrocarbon-bearing waters. The industry standard for water analysis struggles to detect REEs in natural waters under ideal conditions. The detection of REEs in oil and gas field samples becomes all but impossible with the background noise and interferences caused by high concentrations of non-REE ions and residual hydrocarbons. The INL team members have overcome many of these challenges (e.g. McLing, 2014), and continuemore » to develop their methods. Using the methods of the INL team members we measured REEs in high salinity oil and gas produced waters. Our results show that REEs exist as a dissolved species in all waters measured for this project, typically within the parts per trillion range. The samples may be grouped into two broad categories analytically, and these categories match their genesis: Wyoming oil and gas brines contain elevated levels of Europium, and Wyoming industrial pond waters show elevation in heavy REEs (HREEs). While broadly true, important variations exist within both groups. In the same field Europium can vary by more than an order of magnitude, and likewise HREEs in industrial ponds at the same site can vary by more than an order of magnitude. Future work will investigate the reasons for these variations.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. University of Wyoming
  2. Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
EERE
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Geothermal Technologies Office (EE-4G)
OSTI Identifier:
1406996
DOE Contract Number:  
FE0029375
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 42nd Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 13-15, 2017, SGP-TR-212
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; 03 NATURAL GAS; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 02 PETROLEUM; Rare Earth Element; Geochemistry; Oil and Gas; Produced Water; Power Plant; Wyoming

Citation Formats

Nye, Charles, Quillinan, Scott Austin, Neupane, Ghanashyam, and McLing, Travis. Aqueous Rare Earth Element Patterns and Concentration in Thermal Brines Associated With Oil and Gas Production. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Nye, Charles, Quillinan, Scott Austin, Neupane, Ghanashyam, & McLing, Travis. Aqueous Rare Earth Element Patterns and Concentration in Thermal Brines Associated With Oil and Gas Production. United States.
Nye, Charles, Quillinan, Scott Austin, Neupane, Ghanashyam, and McLing, Travis. Mon . "Aqueous Rare Earth Element Patterns and Concentration in Thermal Brines Associated With Oil and Gas Production". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1406996.
@article{osti_1406996,
title = {Aqueous Rare Earth Element Patterns and Concentration in Thermal Brines Associated With Oil and Gas Production},
author = {Nye, Charles and Quillinan, Scott Austin and Neupane, Ghanashyam and McLing, Travis},
abstractNote = {This study is part of a joint effort by the University of Wyoming (UW) School of Energy Resources (SER), the UW Engineering Department, Idaho National Laboratories (INL), and the United States Geological Survey (USGS) to describe rare earth element concentrations in oil and gas produced waters and in coal-fired power station ash ponds. In this work we present rare earth element (REE) and trace metal behavior in produced water from four Wyoming oil and gas fields and surface ash pond water from two coal-fired power stations. The concentration of REEs in oil and gas produced waters is largely unknown. For example, of the 150,000 entries in the USGS National Produced Waters Geochemical Database less than 5 include data for REEs. Part of the reason for this scarcity is the analytical challenge of measuring REEs in high salinity, hydrocarbon-bearing waters. The industry standard for water analysis struggles to detect REEs in natural waters under ideal conditions. The detection of REEs in oil and gas field samples becomes all but impossible with the background noise and interferences caused by high concentrations of non-REE ions and residual hydrocarbons. The INL team members have overcome many of these challenges (e.g. McLing, 2014), and continue to develop their methods. Using the methods of the INL team members we measured REEs in high salinity oil and gas produced waters. Our results show that REEs exist as a dissolved species in all waters measured for this project, typically within the parts per trillion range. The samples may be grouped into two broad categories analytically, and these categories match their genesis: Wyoming oil and gas brines contain elevated levels of Europium, and Wyoming industrial pond waters show elevation in heavy REEs (HREEs). While broadly true, important variations exist within both groups. In the same field Europium can vary by more than an order of magnitude, and likewise HREEs in industrial ponds at the same site can vary by more than an order of magnitude. Future work will investigate the reasons for these variations.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {2}
}

Conference:
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