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Title: Construction Vibration Impacts on the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies.

Abstract

Under the direction of the James W. Todd, Assistant Manager for Engineering within the National Nuclear Security Administration Sandia Field Office, the team listed above has performed the attached study to evaluate the vibration sensitivity of the Center for Integrated Nanotechnolog ies and propose possible mitigation strategies .

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
  2. Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)
  3. Machine Dynamics, Inc., Sale Creek, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1406977
Report Number(s):
SAND-2017-11773
658267
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY

Citation Formats

Hearne, Sean J., Kostranchuk, Theodore, Jungjohann, Katherine Leigh, Bussmann, Ezra, Swartzentruber, Brian, Weiss, Karl, and Wowk, Victor. Construction Vibration Impacts on the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies.. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1406977.
Hearne, Sean J., Kostranchuk, Theodore, Jungjohann, Katherine Leigh, Bussmann, Ezra, Swartzentruber, Brian, Weiss, Karl, & Wowk, Victor. Construction Vibration Impacts on the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies.. United States. doi:10.2172/1406977.
Hearne, Sean J., Kostranchuk, Theodore, Jungjohann, Katherine Leigh, Bussmann, Ezra, Swartzentruber, Brian, Weiss, Karl, and Wowk, Victor. Sun . "Construction Vibration Impacts on the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies.". United States. doi:10.2172/1406977. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1406977.
@article{osti_1406977,
title = {Construction Vibration Impacts on the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies.},
author = {Hearne, Sean J. and Kostranchuk, Theodore and Jungjohann, Katherine Leigh and Bussmann, Ezra and Swartzentruber, Brian and Weiss, Karl and Wowk, Victor},
abstractNote = {Under the direction of the James W. Todd, Assistant Manager for Engineering within the National Nuclear Security Administration Sandia Field Office, the team listed above has performed the attached study to evaluate the vibration sensitivity of the Center for Integrated Nanotechnolog ies and propose possible mitigation strategies .},
doi = {10.2172/1406977},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sun Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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  • In 1999, the United States government announced the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) that included a proposal directed at doubling the nation's investment in nanotechnology to ensure the United States' competitive position in the rapidly developing field of nanotechnology. As part of the NNI, the National Science and Technology Council Interagency Working Group on Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology (IWGN) concluded that research centers would permit activities that cannot be accomplished in the traditional mode of small groups or single investigators or with the current research infrastructure. The IWGN recognized the importance of establishing research centers with major Department of Energymore » (DOE) specialized and user facilities. Consequently, the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences (OBES) plans to support the NNI, in part, through the establishment of an integrated national program of Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRC) affiliated with major facilities at DOE's national laboratories. Specific objectives of the NSRCs are to accomplish the following: (1) Advance the fundamental understanding and control of materials at the nanoscale regime; (2) Provide an environment to support research of a scope, complexity, and disciplinary breadth not possible under traditional investigator or small group efforts; (3) Provide the foundation for the development of nanotechnologies important to the DOE; (4) Provide state-of-the-art equipment to in-house laboratory, university, and industry researchers and optimize the use of national user facilities for materials characterization employing electrons, photons, and neutrons; (5) Provide a formal mechanism for both short- and long-term collaborations and partnerships among DOE laboratory, academic, and industrial researchers; and (6) Provide training for graduate students and postdoctoral associates in interdisciplinary nanoscale science, engineering, and technology research.« less
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