skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Manufacturing Experience for Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Alloys

Abstract

This report documents the results of the development and the manufacturing experience gained at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) while working with the oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) materials MA 956, 14YWT, and 9YWT. The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program of the Office of Nuclear Energy has implemented a program to develop a Uranium-Molybdenum metal fuel for light water reactors. ODS materials have the potential to provide improved performance for the U-Mo concept.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1406829
Report Number(s):
PNNL-25817
AF5810000
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Bennett, Wendy D., Doherty, Ann L., Henager, Charles H., Lavender, Curt A., Montgomery, Robert O., Omberg, Ronald P., Smith, Mark T., and Webster, Ryan A. Manufacturing Experience for Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Alloys. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1406829.
Bennett, Wendy D., Doherty, Ann L., Henager, Charles H., Lavender, Curt A., Montgomery, Robert O., Omberg, Ronald P., Smith, Mark T., & Webster, Ryan A. Manufacturing Experience for Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Alloys. United States. doi:10.2172/1406829.
Bennett, Wendy D., Doherty, Ann L., Henager, Charles H., Lavender, Curt A., Montgomery, Robert O., Omberg, Ronald P., Smith, Mark T., and Webster, Ryan A. Thu . "Manufacturing Experience for Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Alloys". United States. doi:10.2172/1406829. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1406829.
@article{osti_1406829,
title = {Manufacturing Experience for Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Alloys},
author = {Bennett, Wendy D. and Doherty, Ann L. and Henager, Charles H. and Lavender, Curt A. and Montgomery, Robert O. and Omberg, Ronald P. and Smith, Mark T. and Webster, Ryan A.},
abstractNote = {This report documents the results of the development and the manufacturing experience gained at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) while working with the oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) materials MA 956, 14YWT, and 9YWT. The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program of the Office of Nuclear Energy has implemented a program to develop a Uranium-Molybdenum metal fuel for light water reactors. ODS materials have the potential to provide improved performance for the U-Mo concept.},
doi = {10.2172/1406829},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Sep 22 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Thu Sep 22 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share:
  • This program was undertaken to develop a low cost manufacturing process for applying a duplex Cr/Al coating to TD Nickel based on existing coating technology. Several methods of depositing chromium and aluminum were evaluated. These included electroplating, slurry processes and atmospheric pack. The atmospheric pack cementation process was selected as being the most economical and reliable means of depositing the duplex Cr/Al coating. Other methods such as occluded particle electroplating to deposit a chromium--nickel solid solution layer (chromizing) exhibited considerable promise, but required developmental effort outside the scope of this program. Procedures were developed for producing the duplex coating bymore » atmospheric pack cementation on a scale-up production basis. The atmospheric pack process could repeatedly produce the desired levels of chromium and aluminum. Physical and mechanical properties of coated and uncoated TD Nickel were compared; and actual coated TD Nickel engine hardware was engine tested to obtain a comparison between the coating produced in this program and existing commercial coatings. Side-by-side environmental gas turbine engine tests indicated that the performance of the program coating was comparable to commercially available coatings. In addition to a description of the work conducted under this program, a detailed process procedure is supplied which may be used as a base for establishing a commercial production facility. (GRA)« less
  • Oxide dispersion strengthened molybdenum, Mo-ODS, developed by a proprietary powder metallurgy process, exhibits a creep rupture life at 0.65T{sub m} (1,600 C) of three to five orders of magnitude greater than unalloyed molybdenum, while maintaining ductile fracture behavior at temperatures significantly below room temperature. In comparison, the creep rupture life of the Mo-50Re solid solution strengthened alloy at 1,600 C is only an order of magnitude greater than unalloyed molybdenum. The results of microstructural characterization and thermal stability and mechanical property testing are discussed.
  • There is a range of joining techniques available for use with ODS alloys, but care should be exercised in matching the technique to the final duty requirements of the joint. The goal for joining ODS alloys is a joint with no local disruption of the distribution of the oxide dispersion, and no significant change in the size and orientation of the alloy microstructure. Not surprisingly, the fusion welding processes typically employed with wrought alloys produce the least satisfactory results with ODS alloys, but some versions, such as fusion spot welding, and the laser and electron-beam welding technologies, have demonstrated potentialmore » for producing sound joints. Welds made using solid-state spot welding reportedly have exhibited parent metal properties. Thus, it is possible to employ processes that result in significant disruption of the alloy microstructure, as long as the processing parameters are adjustment to minimize the extent of or influence of the changes in the alloy microstructure. Selection among these joining approaches largely depends on the particular application and component configuration, and an understanding of the relationships among processing, alloy microstructure, and final properties is key. Recent developments have resulted in friction welding evolving to be a prime method for joining ODS sheet products, and variants of brazing/diffusion bonding have shown excellent promise for use with tubes and pipes. The techniques that come closest to the goal defined above involve solid-state diffusion bonding and, in particular, it has been found that secondary recrystallization of joints made by pulsed plasma-assisted diffusion can produce the desired, continuous, large alloy grain structure through the joint. Such joints have exhibited creep rupture failure at >82% of the load needed to fail the monolithic parent alloy at 1000 C.« less
  • Iron-based alloys containing chromium, nickel, aluminum, and rare- earth metals or oxides have been developed by mechanical alloying for application in fossil energy systems. The presence of aluminum and nickel leads to precipitation of the Ni{sub 3}Al phase, which can improve the mechanical properties of the alloys. The addition of {approx}4 wt.{percent} Al to the alloy leads to formation of alumina scales when the alloys are exposed to oxidizing environment. A detailed description of the procedures for mechanical alloying is presented, and physical corrosion tests conducted in air and in sulfur-containing atmospheres, and in the presence of deposits of interestmore » in fossil energy systems. 10 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.« less