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Title: What can we learn from in-soil imaging of a live plant: X-ray Computed Tomography and 3D numerical simulation of root-soil system

Abstract

Plant roots play a critical role in plant-soil-microbe interactions that occur in the rhizosphere, as well as processes with important implications to farming, forest management and climate change. X-ray computed tomography (XCT) has been proven to be an effective tool for non-invasive root imaging and analysis. A combination of XCT, open-source software, and our own code was used to noninvasively image a prairie dropseed (Sporobolus heterolepis) specimen, segment the root data to obtain a 3D image of the root structure at 31µm resolution, and extract quantitative information (root volume and surface area) from the 3D data, respectively. Based on the mesh generated from the root structure, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were applied to numerically investigate the root-soil-groundwater system. The plant root conductivity, soil hydraulic conductivity and transpiration rate were shown to control the groundwater distribution. The flow variability and soil water distributions under different scenarios were investigated. Parameterizations were evaluated to show their impacts on the average conductivity. The pore-scale modeling approach provides realistic simulations of rhizosphere flow processes and provides useful information that can be linked to upscaled models.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1406785
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-124115
Journal ID: ISSN 2452-2198; KP1702030
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Rhizosphere; Journal Volume: 3; Journal Issue: P2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; root model; X-ray computational tomography; computational fluid dynamics; root water uptake; rhizosphere

Citation Formats

Yang, Xiaofan, Varga, Tamas, Liu, Chongxuan, and Scheibe, Timothy D. What can we learn from in-soil imaging of a live plant: X-ray Computed Tomography and 3D numerical simulation of root-soil system. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.rhisph.2017.04.017.
Yang, Xiaofan, Varga, Tamas, Liu, Chongxuan, & Scheibe, Timothy D. What can we learn from in-soil imaging of a live plant: X-ray Computed Tomography and 3D numerical simulation of root-soil system. United States. doi:10.1016/j.rhisph.2017.04.017.
Yang, Xiaofan, Varga, Tamas, Liu, Chongxuan, and Scheibe, Timothy D. Thu . "What can we learn from in-soil imaging of a live plant: X-ray Computed Tomography and 3D numerical simulation of root-soil system". United States. doi:10.1016/j.rhisph.2017.04.017.
@article{osti_1406785,
title = {What can we learn from in-soil imaging of a live plant: X-ray Computed Tomography and 3D numerical simulation of root-soil system},
author = {Yang, Xiaofan and Varga, Tamas and Liu, Chongxuan and Scheibe, Timothy D.},
abstractNote = {Plant roots play a critical role in plant-soil-microbe interactions that occur in the rhizosphere, as well as processes with important implications to farming, forest management and climate change. X-ray computed tomography (XCT) has been proven to be an effective tool for non-invasive root imaging and analysis. A combination of XCT, open-source software, and our own code was used to noninvasively image a prairie dropseed (Sporobolus heterolepis) specimen, segment the root data to obtain a 3D image of the root structure at 31µm resolution, and extract quantitative information (root volume and surface area) from the 3D data, respectively. Based on the mesh generated from the root structure, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were applied to numerically investigate the root-soil-groundwater system. The plant root conductivity, soil hydraulic conductivity and transpiration rate were shown to control the groundwater distribution. The flow variability and soil water distributions under different scenarios were investigated. Parameterizations were evaluated to show their impacts on the average conductivity. The pore-scale modeling approach provides realistic simulations of rhizosphere flow processes and provides useful information that can be linked to upscaled models.},
doi = {10.1016/j.rhisph.2017.04.017},
journal = {Rhizosphere},
number = P2,
volume = 3,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}