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Title: Geochemical alteration of wellbore cement by CO 2 or CO 2+H 2 S reaction during long-term carbon storage: Original Research Article: Geochemical alteration of wellbore cement by CO 2

Abstract

Cement samples were reacted with CO 2-saturated groundwater, with or without added H2S (1 wt.%), at 50°C and 10 MPa for up to 13 months (CO 2 only) or for up to 3.5 months (CO 2 + H 2S) under static conditions. After the reaction, X-ray computed tomography images revealed that calcium carbonate precipitation (CaCO 3) occurred extensively within the fractures in the cement matrix, but only partially along fractures at the cement-basalt interface. Exposure of a fractured cement sample to CO2-saturated groundwater (50°C and 10 MPa) over a period of 13 months demonstrated progressive healing of cement fractures by CaCO 3(s) precipitation. After reaction with CO 2 + H 2S-saturated groundwater, CaCO 3 (s) precipitation also occurred more extensively within the cement fracture than along the cement-basalt caprock interfaces. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that major cement carbonation products of the CO 2 + H 2S-saturated groundwater were calcite, aragonite, and vaterite, all consistent with cement carbonation by CO 2-saturated groundwater. While pyrite is thermodynamically favored to form, due to the low H 2S concentration it was not identified by XRD in this study. The cement alteration rate into neat Portland cement columns by CO 2-saturated groundwater was similar atmore » ~0.02 mm/d, regardless of the cement-curing pressure and temperature (P-T) conditions, or the presence of H 2S in the brine. The experimental results imply that the wellbore cement with fractures is likely to be healed during exposure to CO 2- or CO 2 + H 2S-saturated groundwater, whereas fractures along the cement-caprock interface are likely to remain open and vulnerable to the leakage of CO 2.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA
  2. New Jersey City University, Jersey City NJ USA
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1406763
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-114327
Journal ID: ISSN 2152-3878; AA7020000
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Greenhouse Gases: Science and Technology; Journal Volume: 7; Journal Issue: 5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Wellbore cement; CO2 carbonation; CO2 with H2S impurity; CaCO3(s); fracture

Citation Formats

Um, Wooyong, Rod, Kenton A., Jung, Hun Bok, and Brown, Christopher F. Geochemical alteration of wellbore cement by CO2 or CO2+H 2 S reaction during long-term carbon storage: Original Research Article: Geochemical alteration of wellbore cement by CO2. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1002/ghg.1595.
Um, Wooyong, Rod, Kenton A., Jung, Hun Bok, & Brown, Christopher F. Geochemical alteration of wellbore cement by CO2 or CO2+H 2 S reaction during long-term carbon storage: Original Research Article: Geochemical alteration of wellbore cement by CO2. United States. doi:10.1002/ghg.1595.
Um, Wooyong, Rod, Kenton A., Jung, Hun Bok, and Brown, Christopher F. Tue . "Geochemical alteration of wellbore cement by CO2 or CO2+H 2 S reaction during long-term carbon storage: Original Research Article: Geochemical alteration of wellbore cement by CO2". United States. doi:10.1002/ghg.1595.
@article{osti_1406763,
title = {Geochemical alteration of wellbore cement by CO2 or CO2+H 2 S reaction during long-term carbon storage: Original Research Article: Geochemical alteration of wellbore cement by CO2},
author = {Um, Wooyong and Rod, Kenton A. and Jung, Hun Bok and Brown, Christopher F.},
abstractNote = {Cement samples were reacted with CO2-saturated groundwater, with or without added H2S (1 wt.%), at 50°C and 10 MPa for up to 13 months (CO2 only) or for up to 3.5 months (CO2 + H2S) under static conditions. After the reaction, X-ray computed tomography images revealed that calcium carbonate precipitation (CaCO3) occurred extensively within the fractures in the cement matrix, but only partially along fractures at the cement-basalt interface. Exposure of a fractured cement sample to CO2-saturated groundwater (50°C and 10 MPa) over a period of 13 months demonstrated progressive healing of cement fractures by CaCO3(s) precipitation. After reaction with CO2 + H2S-saturated groundwater, CaCO3 (s) precipitation also occurred more extensively within the cement fracture than along the cement-basalt caprock interfaces. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that major cement carbonation products of the CO2 + H2S-saturated groundwater were calcite, aragonite, and vaterite, all consistent with cement carbonation by CO2-saturated groundwater. While pyrite is thermodynamically favored to form, due to the low H2S concentration it was not identified by XRD in this study. The cement alteration rate into neat Portland cement columns by CO2-saturated groundwater was similar at ~0.02 mm/d, regardless of the cement-curing pressure and temperature (P-T) conditions, or the presence of H2S in the brine. The experimental results imply that the wellbore cement with fractures is likely to be healed during exposure to CO2- or CO2 + H2S-saturated groundwater, whereas fractures along the cement-caprock interface are likely to remain open and vulnerable to the leakage of CO2.},
doi = {10.1002/ghg.1595},
journal = {Greenhouse Gases: Science and Technology},
number = 5,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Mar 22 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Tue Mar 22 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}