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Title: Distinctive microbiomes and metabolites linked with weight loss after gastric bypass, but not gastric banding

Abstract

Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) are anatomically different bariatric operations. RYGB achieves greater weight loss compared with LAGB. Changes in the gut microbiome have been documented after RYGB, but not LAGB, and the microbial contribution to sustainable surgical weight loss warrants further evaluation. We hypothesized that RYGB imposes greater changes on the microbiota and its metabolism than LAGB, and that the altered microbiota may contribute to greater weight loss. Using multi-omic approaches, we analyzed fecal microbial community structure and metabolites of pre-bariatric surgery morbidly obese (PreB-Ob), normal weight (NW), post-RYGB, and post-LAGB participants. RYGB microbiomes were significantly different from those from NW, LAGB and PreB-Ob. Microbiome differences between RYGB and PreB- Ob populations were mirrored in their metabolomes. Diversity was higher in RYGB compared with LAGB, possibly because of an increase in the abundance of facultative anaerobic, bile-tolerant and acid-sensible microorganisms in the former. Possibly because of lower gastric acid exposure, phylotypes from the oral cavity, such as Escherichia, Veillonella and Streptococcus, were in greater abundance in the RYGB group, and their abundances positively correlated with percent excess weight loss. Many of these post-RYGB microorganisms are capable of amino-acid fermentation. Amino-acid and carbohydrate fermentation products—isovalerate,more » isobutyrate, butyrate and propionate—were prevalent in RYGB participants, but not in LAGB participants. RYGB resulted in greater alteration of the gut microbiome and metabolome than LAGB, and RYGB group exhibited unique microbiome composed of many amino-acid fermenters, compared with nonsurgical controls.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ORCiD logo; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US), Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1406703
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-119449
Journal ID: ISSN 1751-7362; 48159; 47749; 48612; 49112
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
The ISME Journal
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 11; Journal Issue: 9; Journal ID: ISSN 1751-7362
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Ilhan, Zehra Esra, DiBaise, John K., Isern, Nancy G., Hoyt, David W., Marcus, Andrew K., Kang, Dae-Wook, Crowell, Michael D., Rittmann, Bruce E., and Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa. Distinctive microbiomes and metabolites linked with weight loss after gastric bypass, but not gastric banding. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1038/ismej.2017.71.
Ilhan, Zehra Esra, DiBaise, John K., Isern, Nancy G., Hoyt, David W., Marcus, Andrew K., Kang, Dae-Wook, Crowell, Michael D., Rittmann, Bruce E., & Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa. Distinctive microbiomes and metabolites linked with weight loss after gastric bypass, but not gastric banding. United States. doi:10.1038/ismej.2017.71.
Ilhan, Zehra Esra, DiBaise, John K., Isern, Nancy G., Hoyt, David W., Marcus, Andrew K., Kang, Dae-Wook, Crowell, Michael D., Rittmann, Bruce E., and Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa. Fri . "Distinctive microbiomes and metabolites linked with weight loss after gastric bypass, but not gastric banding". United States. doi:10.1038/ismej.2017.71.
@article{osti_1406703,
title = {Distinctive microbiomes and metabolites linked with weight loss after gastric bypass, but not gastric banding},
author = {Ilhan, Zehra Esra and DiBaise, John K. and Isern, Nancy G. and Hoyt, David W. and Marcus, Andrew K. and Kang, Dae-Wook and Crowell, Michael D. and Rittmann, Bruce E. and Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa},
abstractNote = {Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) are anatomically different bariatric operations. RYGB achieves greater weight loss compared with LAGB. Changes in the gut microbiome have been documented after RYGB, but not LAGB, and the microbial contribution to sustainable surgical weight loss warrants further evaluation. We hypothesized that RYGB imposes greater changes on the microbiota and its metabolism than LAGB, and that the altered microbiota may contribute to greater weight loss. Using multi-omic approaches, we analyzed fecal microbial community structure and metabolites of pre-bariatric surgery morbidly obese (PreB-Ob), normal weight (NW), post-RYGB, and post-LAGB participants. RYGB microbiomes were significantly different from those from NW, LAGB and PreB-Ob. Microbiome differences between RYGB and PreB- Ob populations were mirrored in their metabolomes. Diversity was higher in RYGB compared with LAGB, possibly because of an increase in the abundance of facultative anaerobic, bile-tolerant and acid-sensible microorganisms in the former. Possibly because of lower gastric acid exposure, phylotypes from the oral cavity, such as Escherichia, Veillonella and Streptococcus, were in greater abundance in the RYGB group, and their abundances positively correlated with percent excess weight loss. Many of these post-RYGB microorganisms are capable of amino-acid fermentation. Amino-acid and carbohydrate fermentation products—isovalerate, isobutyrate, butyrate and propionate—were prevalent in RYGB participants, but not in LAGB participants. RYGB resulted in greater alteration of the gut microbiome and metabolome than LAGB, and RYGB group exhibited unique microbiome composed of many amino-acid fermenters, compared with nonsurgical controls.},
doi = {10.1038/ismej.2017.71},
journal = {The ISME Journal},
issn = {1751-7362},
number = 9,
volume = 11,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {5}
}

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