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Title: Water-Lean Solvents for Post-Combustion CO 2 Capture: Fundamentals, Uncertainties, Opportunities, and Outlook

Abstract

Capturing CO2 from the exhaust of coal-fired power plants is a daunting task, requiring selective removal from a dilute gas stream of millions of pounds per hour of a molecule that is considered thermodynamically and kinetically stable. There are commercial solvent technologies containing proprietary blends of aqueous amines such as Econamine FG+, KS-1, Oase® Blue, and Cansolv that may achieve this task, though only one of them has been deployed at scale, albeit in the natural gas industry.1 The Achilles’ heel of amine blends is the energy loss involved with regenerating the solvent, i.e., boiling and condensing millions of pounds of water per hour. This energy loss translates to a sizeable parasitic load on a coal-fired plant, requiring the plant to burn more coal to get back to its nameplate capacity.2 Unsurprisingly, a considerable amount of research has focused on the design of more efficient technologies to lessen this parasitic load. Liquid systems are the lowest hanging fruit from a time and cost perspective, as they have the potential to use aqueous amine infrastructure, with potential for more rapid ascent up the development ladder than porous solids or membranes.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, Washington 99352, United States
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1406697
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-122499
Journal ID: ISSN 0009-2665; KC0302020
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Chemical Reviews; Journal Volume: 117; Journal Issue: 14
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Heldebrant, David J., Koech, Phillip K., Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra, Rousseau, Roger, Malhotra, Deepika, and Cantu, David C. Water-Lean Solvents for Post-Combustion CO 2 Capture: Fundamentals, Uncertainties, Opportunities, and Outlook. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.chemrev.6b00768.
Heldebrant, David J., Koech, Phillip K., Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra, Rousseau, Roger, Malhotra, Deepika, & Cantu, David C. Water-Lean Solvents for Post-Combustion CO 2 Capture: Fundamentals, Uncertainties, Opportunities, and Outlook. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.chemrev.6b00768.
Heldebrant, David J., Koech, Phillip K., Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra, Rousseau, Roger, Malhotra, Deepika, and Cantu, David C. Thu . "Water-Lean Solvents for Post-Combustion CO 2 Capture: Fundamentals, Uncertainties, Opportunities, and Outlook". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.chemrev.6b00768.
@article{osti_1406697,
title = {Water-Lean Solvents for Post-Combustion CO 2 Capture: Fundamentals, Uncertainties, Opportunities, and Outlook},
author = {Heldebrant, David J. and Koech, Phillip K. and Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra and Rousseau, Roger and Malhotra, Deepika and Cantu, David C.},
abstractNote = {Capturing CO2 from the exhaust of coal-fired power plants is a daunting task, requiring selective removal from a dilute gas stream of millions of pounds per hour of a molecule that is considered thermodynamically and kinetically stable. There are commercial solvent technologies containing proprietary blends of aqueous amines such as Econamine FG+, KS-1, Oase® Blue, and Cansolv that may achieve this task, though only one of them has been deployed at scale, albeit in the natural gas industry.1 The Achilles’ heel of amine blends is the energy loss involved with regenerating the solvent, i.e., boiling and condensing millions of pounds of water per hour. This energy loss translates to a sizeable parasitic load on a coal-fired plant, requiring the plant to burn more coal to get back to its nameplate capacity.2 Unsurprisingly, a considerable amount of research has focused on the design of more efficient technologies to lessen this parasitic load. Liquid systems are the lowest hanging fruit from a time and cost perspective, as they have the potential to use aqueous amine infrastructure, with potential for more rapid ascent up the development ladder than porous solids or membranes.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.chemrev.6b00768},
journal = {Chemical Reviews},
number = 14,
volume = 117,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu May 18 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu May 18 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}