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Title: Importance of interlayer H bonding structure to the stability of layered minerals

Abstract

The exact atomic structures of layered minerals have been difficult to characterize because the layers often possess out-of-plane hydrogen atoms that cannot be detected by many analytical techniques. However, the ordering of these bonds are thought to play a fundamental role in the structural stability and solubility of layered minerals. We report a new strategy of using the intense radiation field of a focused electron beam to probe the effect of differences in hydrogen bonding networks on mineral solubility while simultaneously imaging the dissolution behavior in real time via liquid cell electron microscopy. We show the loss in hydrogens from interlayers of boehmite (γ-AlOOH) resulted in 2D nanosheets exfoliating from the bulk that subsequently and rapidly dissolved. However gibbsite (γ-Al(OH)3), with its higher concentration of OH terminating groups, was more accommodating to the deprotonation and stable under the beam.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US), Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1406678
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-126728
Journal ID: ISSN 2045-2322; 49690
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Scientific Reports; Journal Volume: 7; Journal Issue: 1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Liquid Cell Electron Microscopy; liquid cell TEM; liquid cell STEM; Boehmite; Dissolution; Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Conroy, Michele, Soltis, Jennifer A., Wittman, Rick S., Smith, Frances N., Chatterjee, Sayandev, Zhang, Xin, Ilton, Eugene S., and Buck, Edgar C. Importance of interlayer H bonding structure to the stability of layered minerals. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-13452-7.
Conroy, Michele, Soltis, Jennifer A., Wittman, Rick S., Smith, Frances N., Chatterjee, Sayandev, Zhang, Xin, Ilton, Eugene S., & Buck, Edgar C. Importance of interlayer H bonding structure to the stability of layered minerals. United States. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-13452-7.
Conroy, Michele, Soltis, Jennifer A., Wittman, Rick S., Smith, Frances N., Chatterjee, Sayandev, Zhang, Xin, Ilton, Eugene S., and Buck, Edgar C. 2017. "Importance of interlayer H bonding structure to the stability of layered minerals". United States. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-13452-7.
@article{osti_1406678,
title = {Importance of interlayer H bonding structure to the stability of layered minerals},
author = {Conroy, Michele and Soltis, Jennifer A. and Wittman, Rick S. and Smith, Frances N. and Chatterjee, Sayandev and Zhang, Xin and Ilton, Eugene S. and Buck, Edgar C.},
abstractNote = {The exact atomic structures of layered minerals have been difficult to characterize because the layers often possess out-of-plane hydrogen atoms that cannot be detected by many analytical techniques. However, the ordering of these bonds are thought to play a fundamental role in the structural stability and solubility of layered minerals. We report a new strategy of using the intense radiation field of a focused electron beam to probe the effect of differences in hydrogen bonding networks on mineral solubility while simultaneously imaging the dissolution behavior in real time via liquid cell electron microscopy. We show the loss in hydrogens from interlayers of boehmite (γ-AlOOH) resulted in 2D nanosheets exfoliating from the bulk that subsequently and rapidly dissolved. However gibbsite (γ-Al(OH)3), with its higher concentration of OH terminating groups, was more accommodating to the deprotonation and stable under the beam.},
doi = {10.1038/s41598-017-13452-7},
journal = {Scientific Reports},
number = 1,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}
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