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Title: Development of Rotational Accelerometers Final Report CRADA No. TSB-2008-99

Abstract

One of the difficulties in fabricating an inexpensive angular rate or rotation sensor is producing a device that is insensitive to acceleration, including the constant acceleration of gravity. The majority of rate sensors are either tuning fork type devices sensing a relatively weak force (i.e., Coriolis effect) and thus not very sensitive, or gyroscopes (either rotating or fiber optic based) that are large, consume lots of power and are expensive. This project was a collaborative effort between LLNL and The Fredericks Company to develop a rotational sensor as a standardized, commercial product. The Fredericks Company possessed expertise and capabilities in the technical aspects of manufacturing this type of sensor, and they were interested in collaborating with LLNL to manufacture the rotational rate sensors as a commercial product.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1406436
Report Number(s):
LLNL-TR-740344
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; 42 ENGINEERING

Citation Formats

Hunter, S., and Crosson, R.. Development of Rotational Accelerometers Final Report CRADA No. TSB-2008-99. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1406436.
Hunter, S., & Crosson, R.. Development of Rotational Accelerometers Final Report CRADA No. TSB-2008-99. United States. doi:10.2172/1406436.
Hunter, S., and Crosson, R.. Mon . "Development of Rotational Accelerometers Final Report CRADA No. TSB-2008-99". United States. doi:10.2172/1406436. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1406436.
@article{osti_1406436,
title = {Development of Rotational Accelerometers Final Report CRADA No. TSB-2008-99},
author = {Hunter, S. and Crosson, R.},
abstractNote = {One of the difficulties in fabricating an inexpensive angular rate or rotation sensor is producing a device that is insensitive to acceleration, including the constant acceleration of gravity. The majority of rate sensors are either tuning fork type devices sensing a relatively weak force (i.e., Coriolis effect) and thus not very sensitive, or gyroscopes (either rotating or fiber optic based) that are large, consume lots of power and are expensive. This project was a collaborative effort between LLNL and The Fredericks Company to develop a rotational sensor as a standardized, commercial product. The Fredericks Company possessed expertise and capabilities in the technical aspects of manufacturing this type of sensor, and they were interested in collaborating with LLNL to manufacture the rotational rate sensors as a commercial product.},
doi = {10.2172/1406436},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Oct 16 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Oct 16 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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