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Title: Lagrangian technique to calculate window interface velocity from shock velocity measurements: Application for quartz windows

Abstract

Measurement of the window interface velocity is a common technique for investigating the dynamic response materials at high strain rates. However, these measurements are limited in pressure to the range where the window remains transparent. The most common window material for this application is lithium fluoride, which under single shock compression becomes opaque at ~200 GPa. To date, no other window material has been identified for use at higher pressures. Here, we present a Lagrangian technique to calculate the interface velocity from a continuously measured shock velocity, with application to quartz. The quartz shock front becomes reflective upon melt, at ~100 GPa, enabling the use of velocity interferometry to continuously measure the shock velocity. This technique overlaps with the range of pressures accessible with LiF windows and extends the region where wave profile measurements are possible to pressures in excess of 2000 GPa. Lastly, we show through simulated data that the technique accurately reproduces the interface velocity within 20% of the initial state, and that the Lagrangian technique represents a significant improvement over a simple linear approximation.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
  2. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1406363
Report Number(s):
SAND-2017-10955J
Journal ID: ISSN 0021-8979; 657693; TRN: US1703036
Grant/Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000; NA0003525
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Applied Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 122; Journal Issue: 8; Journal ID: ISSN 0021-8979
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS

Citation Formats

McCoy, Chad A., and Knudson, Marcus D. Lagrangian technique to calculate window interface velocity from shock velocity measurements: Application for quartz windows. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4985788.
McCoy, Chad A., & Knudson, Marcus D. Lagrangian technique to calculate window interface velocity from shock velocity measurements: Application for quartz windows. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4985788.
McCoy, Chad A., and Knudson, Marcus D. 2017. "Lagrangian technique to calculate window interface velocity from shock velocity measurements: Application for quartz windows". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4985788.
@article{osti_1406363,
title = {Lagrangian technique to calculate window interface velocity from shock velocity measurements: Application for quartz windows},
author = {McCoy, Chad A. and Knudson, Marcus D.},
abstractNote = {Measurement of the window interface velocity is a common technique for investigating the dynamic response materials at high strain rates. However, these measurements are limited in pressure to the range where the window remains transparent. The most common window material for this application is lithium fluoride, which under single shock compression becomes opaque at ~200 GPa. To date, no other window material has been identified for use at higher pressures. Here, we present a Lagrangian technique to calculate the interface velocity from a continuously measured shock velocity, with application to quartz. The quartz shock front becomes reflective upon melt, at ~100 GPa, enabling the use of velocity interferometry to continuously measure the shock velocity. This technique overlaps with the range of pressures accessible with LiF windows and extends the region where wave profile measurements are possible to pressures in excess of 2000 GPa. Lastly, we show through simulated data that the technique accurately reproduces the interface velocity within 20% of the initial state, and that the Lagrangian technique represents a significant improvement over a simple linear approximation.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4985788},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 8,
volume = 122,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on August 24, 2018
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